Dust Tactics Supply Drop Boxes

No wanker jokes, please…

Since this became a thing last week (along with a roof leak that has had half of the house lights out of action only the night before), I haven’t been doing much proper painting, and typing has been limited to pecking at the keys with one hand. So neither painting nor blogging have been all that much of a thing, and my cleaning up of the paint desk got halfway done (underneath) but I only got as far as cleaning up the Old Citadel/Coat D’Arms/P3 style pots that were scattered about. I’d been wanting to write up a post about the second squad of Minotaurs Space marines I finished recently, but my mood hasn’t been great enough to concentrate on it, so I’m doing this one instead on the scenery I’ve just finished up with this weekend.

Minotaurs Space Marines

Allied DUST Tactics Supply drop crates.

I have done a little bit of painting of sorts though – more simple scatter scenery. These crates come from the various DUST Tactics boxed sets I’ve accumulated over the years. Like so much in my collection, they sat around unused for ages before I got them out and primed them with PSC US Armour and Dunkelgelb Warspray cans. I did that several months ago, before winter set in and made spraying in any form very difficult. Since I could do very little else with my wrist as it is, I got Marouda to help me out over the weekend and tried out the Plastic Soldier Company spray stains that I purchased several years ago but have avoided using on my models in favour of more controlled washes and so forth applied by brush. I didn’t really enjoy using them, but they did the job – especially once I went over them with a drybrush afterwards (and a little dark spot wash on the US ones). I completed them with a gloss polyurethane varnish afterwards for hardiness, followed by Testor’s Dullcote to give them a nice matt finish.

Iron Warriors Chaos Space Marines

Axis DUST Tactics Supply drop crates.

The Axis crates were painted in the same manner as the US ones, though painting them and even looking at them now brings huge annoyance, as the assembly line workers in China seem to have mis-assembled several of the crates, as they have three different types of end-cap mixed across two different types of chassis. Still, if I don’t look too hard, I’ll be able to get past it.

Abwurfbehälter with Fallschirmjäger

Abwurfbehälter with Fallschirmjäger

Abwurfbehälter with Fallschirmjäger

This style of supply drop canister is loosely based on the Abwurfbehälter that were used by the Fallschirmjäger during WWII. The real ones went through several iterations – beginning as wood and finally ending up in a metal style that was the most common and well known. In WWII the Abwurfbehälter had specific markings that denoted their contents, though in the case of these Dust ones, I’ve decided to keep mine entirely without markings – so as to be more generic to work more easily across more games – From DUST (if I ever play it) to Konflict ’47 to 30&40k, various 28mm Star Wars games and hell, even moderns or Bolt Action.

More Fast Scenery – Confrontation Walls, DUST Dragon’s Teeth

Continuing the drive I’ve been on in knocking over fast-ish scenery projects recently, here’s a couple more things I’ve completed in the past week or so.

First up are some stone walls from the Confrontation starter set – which is also the place that the recent Hill Ruins came from. This time, I remembered to add a figure for scale. I like these walls a lot. They’re just the thing (along with the hill) that whoever owns the current rights to should be churning out en masse as cheap and great-looking scenery in hard plastic.

Because I’ve got two starter sets, I’ve ended up with 4 of each piece (the set comes with 2 of each piece, plus the hill, figures, dice, tape measure, rules, etc. Just the usual as far as painting goes on these – base coat, drybrush, wash, drybrush again, weathering powders.

Small Confrontation walls, with Elf for Scale.

Large Confrontation walls, with Elf still for scale.

Confrontation walls again, alongside Italieri Fountain

When I first showed off the Italieri fountain, awhile back, I got asked quite a reasonable question about scale. So this time I’m showing the figure to demonstrate both the scale, and also how well these ruined wall sections fit in with other scenery to create a space that could fit in anywhere from a Fantasy world to WWII to the 41st Millennium. Take away the fountain and the walls will work just as perfectly in an Ancients setting.

Confrontation walls combine nicely to make a ruined building. Call Time Team!

 

I also started and finished a second batch of 6 Dragon’s Teeth/Tank Traps from DUST Tactics sets. I started with 6 of them, from various starter sets and so forth, painted them at least a year ago, then they sat around. In the last year or so, I’ve discovered another 6 of them, gleaned from various DUST expansion sets, and so the lot of them sat around taking up space in my painting area, until last week when I finally pulled my fist out and painted the new ones. Which predictably took just a couple of hours in a day that I was also busy doing all sorts of other things in. So – probably not worth the delay in getting ’round to them, then.

DUST Dragon’s Teeth Tank Traps

Nothing amazing. Painted with a base of Woodland Scenics’ Concrete, then some washes, drybrushing and Tamiya weathering stuff. They look decent and suitably grubby with a realistic enough look on the table top.

DUST Dragon’s Teeth – Area Denial!

With 12 of them now finished, there’s enough of them to provide a fair bit of Area Denial to enemy armour. Again, suitable for battlefields anywhere from WWII through to the far future. Though I have admittedly just realised that there’s no scale shot with a vehicle for size context. I’ll get that sorted shortly.

 

 

 

Review – DUST Airfield Accessory Pack – Quonset Huts

I’ve looked at these in the past, when I got some of these models as part of one of the DUST campaign sets – Operation Icarus. Basically, I liked the models so much that I bought a standalone set as well. While playing a game of KoW recently against Marouda, I decided to open and assemble the set while I waited for her to make her agonisingly slow move. This is the result.

DUST – Airfield Accessory Pack – Quonset Huts

While they’re sized for DUST to take up a terrain square each, they can easily be butted up against one another for more realistic, longer huts.

They come stacked up in the box.

Unlike the ones that come with Operation Icarus, these ones do not come assembled.

End-Walls

They do come separated from the sprue though, and pretty nicely clean – making assembly a doddle.

Slide the two walls in and you’re assembled!

With a bit of plastic cement, I went from opening the box to having them all assembled inside 10 minutes.

 

Just after taking the last shots, I went outside with a rattle can of Rust-Oleum spray in Nutmeg and had them all base coated. When the weather fines up for a little while at a time I can spray again (like, when I’m not at work!) I’ll give them a second light coat. Then I’ll spray on a bit of olive green and such. What I’m getting at is that they’re as easy to paint up as they are to assemble. And if I weren’t so anal-retentive at times they’d already be “good enough”. (Gotta do the window frames and such before I can call them “finished”, you see!)

As an inexpensive box of easily-assembled and easily painted terrain, I can’t recommend them highly enough. I’ll show them again once they’re 100% finished, which is more down to the current winter weather here in Melbourne making spraying difficult and proper photography a depressing proposition. I’ll (probably) get around to using them for DUST at some stage, but I like them because they’re flexible enough to be used anywhere in games set from WWII right up to modern times and beyond. Since my vision of that 41st Millenium that’s so popular encompasses architecture beyond the current aesthetic of incredibly gaudy pieces, or Eagle Turrets with Penis Cannons, I’m very happy to include terrain pieces like these on my personal 40k battlefields as well.

Recommended!

 

 

Inconsequential Things

As I get older, I come to the realisation about many things in my life. I’ll probably never get around to watching all the TV shows I’d like to. Likewise with movies. I don’t know if I’ll ever get around to playing all of the board and miniature games I’ve bought – and I know I’ll never finish all of the PC, 360 and PS3 games I’ve bought. I also realise that I’ll probably never get around to painting all of the models I own – yet, as with all of these things – I continue to collect and accumulate more and more of them – on a weekly basis.

So what does this mean for painting? Well, there are two main roads I can go down. Either I can try to paint better, and spend all my time trying to learn new techniques, increase my skills, and improve all elements of my game. My friend Cash Wiley is one such painter, who has come along incredibly in terms of skill in the last two or so years. However, Cash only finishes a relative few figures per year – albeit to a high standard that is increasing all of the time. My (failed) target last year was 365, and I’m on my second attempt for 365 this year. The other path is that of simply getting shit finished and onto the table. Because you know what? “Good enough” is actually good enough from four feet away when each individual in a block of 10 or 20 or 40 really isn’t all that important and doesn’t need to be anywhere near your best work. I’ve been reading the Bolt Action and Hail Caesar rulebooks over the past few evenings, and almost all of the sumptuous models in those books, in the evocative and atmospheric photos simply don’t pass muster as display models. Yet, ranked up or walking through hedgerows in the close-up photos in those books, they still manage to look fucking amazing.

So what for me? I won a few painting comps in my youth – my best and most amusing being equal first with myself (they couldn’t choose which of my two figures they liked the best) at CanCon back in 1992. I should photograph and post those guys sometime, too. But with father time and my own inevitable demise starting to make themselves felt, I’ve decided that every model can’t be my best model. As readers would have seen with the recent speedpaints of Zombies and, erm, more Zombies, and the Treeman and the Bolt Throwers, I’ve been going for speed lately. I think really though, my path as a painter needs to go down the middle. I need to finish stuff. Now more than ever really, especially with my games table now being a thing that exists. I also need to take time out from mass production and speed-blasting through stuff from time to time to work on individual figures with details and freehand, for the soul of it all.

This post, aside from reading a bit like a teenage girl’s diary or a man in midlife crisis (neither of which is totally accurate :p), is mostly a chance to show off a bunch of stuff I’ve gotten done this year. Nothing amazing or outstanding. Inconsequential things really. Much of it is scenery, and in the scheme of it all, none of it is really important. But it’s a bunch of stuff that got done, and in that, it’s good enough. The plan is to photograph everything that I finish this year, and eventually to photograph everything that’s painted in my collection. That last part might take some time.

Mid-90’s GW Dryads.

These guys are some Dryads that I was either given or sold quite cheap by a friend back in the mid-90s. I’m not sure why I wanted them, so they must have been cheap or free. I think they may actually be recasts, given how malformed some of them are. Anyway, I found them in the bottom of a box of figures recently, and since I was able to finish the Bones Ent/Spirit of the Forest in a day recently, I thought I’d try and knock these up quickly as well in a similar manner. While they’re no works of art up close, they’ll look fine from across the table in KoW or in a game of Pathfinder, etc. A good example of “good enough”!

DUST Quonset Huts

Dust Quonset Huts

The Quonset huts I previewed a few posts ago when I cracked open some of the DUST Tactice expansion boxes. These painted up pretty quickly. I went with a worn desert scheme since my main mat is a desert mat. It also seems to be the most appropriate colour for moderns, and of course works just fine for WWII and 40k. I need to buy another couple of packs of these – they’re pretty great as well as inexpensive.

DUST Quonset Hut with Space Marine for scale.

Dark Angel Marine charges out of the Quonset Hut doorway.

I also took a couple of pics featuring a GW Space Marine, since they’re so ubiquitous that they’re very useful for establishing scale for this sort of thing. I’m sure the Dark Angels have some fights around these huts in their future!

Aged statues.

Here we have four statues made from random miniatures, some short resin columns that were no doubt in a bargain bin, and some plaques made from card. These were all originally made about 8-10 or so years ago. The writing is all painted freehand, and comes from an English-Greek dictionary, and an English-Russian dictionary. Naturally, I can’t recall what they actually say so many years later. This year’s work on them has been to “dirty them up” as they were way too clean – hence the dirt and wear on the stone, and the verdigris on the statues – which was my first play with the new Citadel Technical Paint “Nihilakh Oxide”. Verdict: It’s okay.

Resin wooden barrels.

Resin wooden barrels. Chronopia figures for scale.

These barrels were started years and years ago. When? Who can remember. The important thing is that they’re finished now. I had a bit of fun (back when I started them) freehanding the cans on the two smaller sets. I’ve included the second pic with the Chronopia figures for scale – the barrels are a good size for both roleplaying as well as various types of wargaming. Sadly, I found several more of them in a box this evening. So.. more to come, more to go. After a bit of Internet Detective work, (and using my memory) I found the barrels, which are still available, over at Scotia Grendel Miniatures.

Battle for Macragge Power Pylons

Power Pylon things from the 4th Edition 40k starter set: Battle for Macragge. I just added the tufts to these this year, and that’s too little for me to count them as part of this year’s tally (they were only finished last year). They were sitting next to a bunch of the other stuff I grabbed to photograph tonight, so they got a pic taken as well, since they fit the theme of this post, and as stated, I want to eventually photograph and post everything.

Trapdoors and Grates.

More random resin stuff from my dark past. Dungeon scenery stuff this time, along with two trapdoors from the GW Lord of the Rings Mines of Moria boxed set. The usual drybrushing and so forth, of course, but with the addition of oil-based MIG rust washes added. An example of wanting to knock stuff over but also using simple, inconsequential  things as an opportunity to play with new materials and techniques. – Like the statues above and Nihilakh Oxide. And I’ve just found them. The Grills pack from Grendel – though my pack  back in the day only came with three, not the six they now come with. The last piece of that set is on my “stuff that’s been started and put aside” shelf right now.

Resin Graves

More resin gravestones.

Once again, more resin randomness from my past. At one point, back when I started these in the noughties – I planned to base them on and make a single large scenery piece of a graveyard that I could plonk down on a table. At some point back then after startting the large base I changed my mind and decided to leave these as standalone pieces, which I think was and remains a better idea. Much more flexible this way, and I can still make an actual graveyard piece if I want to use the various tombstones that have been part of various GW (and others’) skeleton kits over the years. While these are more fantasy themed, but these could also work well for WWII or Zombiepocalypse gaming quite easily. And yep, it turns out that the graveyard set is also a Grendel Set. I suspect that a huge percentage of my resin scenery will turn out to be these kits. I bought a hell of a lot of them back in the day.

Secret Weapon Scrap Yard Barricade Truck.

Secret Weapon Scrap Yard Barricade Truck.

Secret Weapon Scrap Yard Barricade Truck.

Secret Weapon Scrap Yard Barricade Truck.

One of the real highlights of my Secret Weapon Miniatures Bag(s) ‘o’ Crap that I picked up in December – along with the Hesco and Jersey barriers shown previously was this overturned Half-track Ute (or truck) from the Secret Weapon Miniatures Scrap Yard Barricades set. I had quite a lot of fun painting this, with layers of washes and drybrushing and mediums and edging and applying effects with foam and so forth. Obviously this thing works best for Sci-Fi/40k/GorkaMorka/Post-apocalyptic stuff, but if you squint, it could also work for moderns in Afghanistan or the like.

Secret Weapon Destroyed Tank Turret.

Secret Weapon Destroyed Tank Turret

Secret Weapon Destroyed Tank Turret.

Secret Weapon Destroyed Tank Turret.

Another nice surprise in my Bag(s) ‘o’ Crap was this turret. Part of the Secret Weapon Miniatures Scrap Yard Destroyed Tank set. A pretty nice piece, though Holy 3-d print lines, Batman! Still, for the price I paid for it, and even full RRP ($20 for a whole tank) it’s pretty nifty. It’s just occurred to me that I should have taken a scale shot with that Dark Angel next to the Truck and this Turret, but rest assured that both are well taller than The Emporer’s Finest, and I’ll take a couple of scale shots as an append to one of my next blog posts. Again, with a little squinting, this thing will work well in games set in any year from 1940-41,000.

And that, my friends, is that.

A not insubstantial update, but as I noted at the start, made of many of the sort of things that hardly justify an update in their own right. I’m up to 81 miniatures finished so far this year on Day 60. I’m ahead of schedule, though only because my criteria is so loose. Still, shit’s getting done. Which can only be a good thing. I hope to soon finish a few of the things blocking me from a couple of “fun” figures that I’m really looking forward to.

Ach! Zombies! – WarZone 1st Edition Dark Legion Zombies, DUST Zombies (again).

Groundskeeper Willie. Zombie Hunter.

Who better to quote when beginning a zombie-themed post than that great Zombie Hunter, Groundskeeper Willie?

First up, some WarZone zombies. I haven’t played WarZone in years, and my previous forces were Cybertronic as my primary and Imperial as my secondary, but I did paint up a few models back in the day. Only one of them is on the blog, though.

WarZone Dark Legion Zombies!

WarZone Dark Legion Zombies!

These were bought back sometime in the 1990s, after 2nd Edition Warzone came out, failed, and Target Games was down. My FLGS of the day was selling off a pile of Warzone stuff on clearance, and so I picked up a whole ton of stuff using the logic that I could use it “one day”. Flash forward to 2013, and I received my Indiegogo Zombies from Studio Miniatures. I assembled about half of the shambling horde, and decided to pick out these guys from the two blisters in a box, glued them down, primed them, base coated the flesh in a few shades of yellowy-brown and green. And then got distracted and they went into a box.

More WarZone Dark Legion Zombies

After my recent speedpaint of the DUST Zombies, inspired by Sho3box’s stuff (and wanting to make space by getting rid of the pile of unopened DUST boxes) I was well chuffed, and with Grimdork starting to pump out some cool looking Zombie models from Sedition Wars, I got inspired to dig these guys out (which is surprising, after all of the shit around that game) and finish them off – so I’ve done just that. Not quite speed painting per se, since they’ve been a side project that I do a few minutes work on while working on other stuff, but with an eye to finishing them ASAP as well.

The Undead Horde – WarZone Edition.

A bit more detail on these guys than the DUST ones, and I tried out the new GW Blood for the Blood God paint, which worked well enough. Didn’t really notice much difference from Tamiya Clear Red to be honest, but I really didn’t use a whole lot on them. These guys came up pretty well, but the shots are a little dark. I really need to get myself a light box. And somewhere to set it up. That has access to several lights or power points.

Hm, yeah. These photos are way too dark. I’ll take them again at some point. These were taken in diffused natural light and looked bright enough at the time. I think the white paper behind them threw the light balance way off on the camera…

I also took a couple of shots of the DUST Zombies this morning as well. The shots from their previous post are okay, but kind of take away from how I felt the teeth and eyes came out on them. Like I said at the time, they’re speed painted and weren’t done for awesome, but I was happy with how those details came out, so I may as well show them off. 

DUST Zombies!

Naturally, the guy I kept trying to get into focus (bottom left) was the only one who wouldn’t. You can also see a representative from each of the 5 “squads” that I decided to differentiate by the use of slightly different flesh tones.

Coming to get you, they are…

So all in all – more figures for Typhus’ horde in 40k. I should probably paint Typhus up sometime, though I’ve got a couple of decent proxies should I decide to run him in the meantime.

From the Painting Desk #4 – Gorillas, Elves, Zombies and Scenery

So with the paint enthusiasm seemingly on the go right now – for another couple of days at least – here’s the stuff I’m working on right now. You’ll notice that those bloody Mantic Ogre Shooters have been temporarily put to the side. The lack of pleasure I was getting from painting them certainly affected my enthusiasm, so I figure a short break from them should help me come back to them somewhat refreshed in a little while. Once those six are finished, I’ll be able to start on the FUN Ogre stuff! Or the Chariots. Those are less fun.

Axis Gorillaz (feat. Damon Albarn)

Anyway, finishing the DUST Zombies recently got the next few boxes of DUST stuff opened – Axis Gorillas! That’s another three boxes disposed of (cleaned up!)

Swordmasters of Hoeth WIP on a temporary regiment base.

My recent games of Kings of War (BetRep to follow sometime in the next week, hopefully-maybe, caused me to start on a unit of Swordmasters of Hoeth, which I guess would be Palace Guard in the KoW Elf army, but is standing in for Twilight Kin Darksome Guard right now. Whatever. They’re Elves! The best part of these (so far) is that they were completely unpainted just a week ago. At the glacial pace I paint, getting to this point is pretty amazing. The basing has set me back 2 or 3 days, since it’s slow, unfun and tedious. (Hi, Cash!)

Basing almost complete. Then crests and boots!

I’m painting them up a little different to other High Elf armies I’ve seen. I’ve had a small collection of unpainted WFB High Elves for 15-18 years, but never had the enthusiasm or a reason to paint them. Ever since The Burning Crusade was released for World of Warcraft, I knew how I wanted to (eventually) paint my High Elves – as Blood Elves rather then the typical White/Blue/Silver with Gold & Red accents most HE armies are painted in. So I’m going Red/Yellow/Gold with Silver and Green accents. It’s giving them a nice autumnal feel, as well as regal & rich – though obviously the colours are highly saturated.

Zombies!

Next up we have some zombies from WarZone, circa the early 1990’s. These would have been purchased during the file sale phase after WarZone 2nd Ed managed to kill our local enthusiasm for the game, and Heartbreaker started to crash and burn. I never actually played Dark Legion, but regardless was willing to pick up a couple of blisters (I’m guessing 2 or 3, since I have 10 figures here?) on closeout. I basecoated the flesh on these about 8(?) months ago when I started assembling my Studion Miniatures IGG KS figures, but like so many projects over the years, (Ogre Shooters!) they got shoved to the side. The initial plan was to use Army Painted dip on them (and the others) but since the DUST Zombies went together just fine and quick using the AP washes, I’m going in that direction with these instead. They have more details and individuality than the DUST figures – and lots more exposed skin, bone and viscera, but I’m still hoping to have them finished in a couple of days. Again, these are more likely to see the tabletop in 40k working alongside Typhus then a WarZone game, but painted is painted, and they can work across several games.

Some DUST Campaigns

Also inspired by wanting to clean stuff up, I decided to unbox these two of my DUST campaign box expansions. Seelowe because of the Character-model Gorilla inside (who you can see above in the background of the Gorilla pic), and Icarus for the Quonset huts, which I figured I could paint reasonably quickly. All of the rest of the contents got shovelled into the DUST Core box set.

Quonset Huts from DUST.

Considering that these have only been out of their box for about 14 hours, (including my sleep overnight) they’re not doing too badly. Hoping to finish them today, and varnish overnight/tomorrow. I might even buy some more, since they’re good looking, cheap and effective!

And that’s it for this quick WIP post. I’ll update again when some of it is finished!

DUST Tactics – Axis Zombies – Speedpaint results.

So as part of the big cleanup resulting from the games room project, I rediscovered my large stash of unopened DUST Tactics unit boxes. I ‘ve also been reading through Sho3box’s blog recently, and the man has a nice collection of Zombies going there. This helped to inspire/motivate me to see if I could paint up the boxes of Nazi Axis Zombies. At first I thought I had four boxes, but then found another two(!)

Many unpainted Zombies.

I elected to use the default DUST grey undercoat as the base coat for the models, mostly due to there being 30 of them, and wanting to get them done quickly. I initially tried a few experiments trying to wash some feldgrau or feldblau into them from my Coat’d’Arms paints, but simply put, they just didn’t work.
Given that these guys were
a) Zombies, so low on the scale of painting importance.
b) There’s 30 of them.
I simply gave up in the end, rather than completely repainting their jumpsuits with a different base coat.

The production line.

I did use these figures as a bit of a testbed for a couple of new mediums I’d found on the net and mixed up – I always find low-priority figures to be good for that  sort of thing.

While I’m aware that the paint on these is very much tabletop quality, and nothing anyone is going to be excited to emulate, I’m noting down the colours anyway – for my own future reference if nothing else.

I drybrushed several layers of grey onto them, starting with VMC Basalt Grey through a mixture to pure Army Painter Ash Grey, then washed down with a 1:1:1 mix of Les’ Soft Body Black, AP Dark Tone (formerly Badab Black, apparently) and my new custom paint thinning mix (found on the net, might have been on WAU) 50% Distilled Water, 30% Liquitex Flow Aid, 10% Drying Retarder, 10% Matte Medium (and 90% love!)

Hordes of the Things.

Boots are VMC Black Grey with AP Dark Tone (again, I considered brown ankle boots but went with the equally if not more common black).

Bases were painted in VMC Oily steel, washed with a couple of drops of VGC Orange Fire thinned with “Dr Faust’s Magic Wash” – which is 1pt Future Floor Polish/5pts Distilled Water. Then drybrushed with VMA Steel. This was to give a mildly rusted effect, though it didn’t turn out quite as well as I had hoped – though still good enough.

Panzergloves and, erm, Mace Hands (Keulehands?) were VMC Oily Steel, then drybrushed with VMA Steel, then washed with AP Dark Tone (I considered using blue, green or brown as well, but when I asked Marouda we went with Black.) Finally, I painted the little nodules with VMA Rust then VMA brass. I considered a cool glowing green, but I’m just not willing OSL-ing 90-odd little nodules across 60 arms. Especially on speed-paint Zombies. Finished them off after that with AP Soft Tone.

Grouped into their “Squads”.

I also needed some way to distinguish them in game terms for DUST (where they come in units of 5). I considered painting the bolts on the bases different colours (gold, silver, brass, copper, etc) then thought of painting runes and symbols used by WWII Germany on the backs of their bases. In the end I decided to paint each group of five with different (rotting) flesh tones. I figure this way the zombies can all be mixed up together if they’re running down halls in Incursion, spreading plague for the Dark Legion in WarZone or doing Typhus’ bidding in 40k – but can still be split up into 5-a-side teams for DUST.

Based on that, I just started the skin tones with a mix of Old-GW Rotting Flesh and AP Army Green, then for each subsequent 5 I mixed in other colours. Blended some purple into one set while it was still mostly-wet. Later on, I washed the flesh on the others with purple, brown, green, red and blue AP wash. Eyes and teeth were done with a fine brush and an old VMC off-white paint (the heat label has worn off, so I’m not sure what the paint is anymore!)

Harsh shading, unhealthy complexions.

As you can see, the figures are harshly shaded by the drybrushing and washes, and far from my best pieces or works of art. No argument, there are much better-painted examples of these out there on the net, and if I’d had one box of five, I’d have taken much more individual care. But – they’re zombies, so I think harsh and dirty works for them (I doubt they have a lot of laundry done). They’re a horde, so fast and effective is what I was after, and, well, they took 6 days from unboxing to varnishing – and that’s 6 days of doing a little painting and a lot of other stuff. While I wouldn’t use this method for many other figures, I think it worked here and I now have a bunch of figures that can work pretty well across several settings, as well as – obviously – for the boardgame they’re made for.

Finally, there’s the issue of blood and gore. I do own a pot of Tamiya Clear Red. I recently bought the embarassingly-named GW Blood for the Blood God and Nurgle’s Rot, and look forward to an opportunity to test them out. While I enjoy a bit of splatter from time to time, and as I mentioned earlier, I don’t see these guys getting their uniforms/jumpsuits cleaned very often – they’re clearly also not feral zombies, as we have in most zombie media. These guys are pretty obviously product, tools, “assets” of their controllers, so they’re not getting out there into the streets and just tearing the shit out of people. About a third of them also lack hands, having two Keulehands, which I imagine makes the whole “tearing gibbets of flesh off a victim to consume them” thing a little more tricky anyway. These guys also seem more mummified by ways of preservation, rather than decaying – which again makes some sense if you view them as a created commodity, rather than a freak of nature. (And yes, I’ve seen the awful looking 1:6 scale figure, but these look quite different from that as sculpts). So given all of this, the fact that they’re not obviously decaying, and that their heads are the only fleshy bits of them visible (no rents in their jumpsuits!) I’ve left them clean of blood, gore and pus – Just as World Eaters don’t need to always be covered in fresh or dried blood spatter, neither do all zombies.

The completed Horde.