Mantic Terrain Crate – First bits of painted scatter.

Mantic Terrain Crate

A few weeks ago I had my Mantic Terrain Crate Kickstarter pledge arrive. I basically got the “one of everything” pledge, so it was interesting to go through all of the bits and pieces, and see what came out nicely, what was warped and fixable, what was warped to hell, and what I could just start working on and knock out quickly and painlessly. Of course, I ended up mixing the pieces together without regard for which set they came from, since my intent was completely to work out which ones I wanted to paint first.

Mantic Terrain Crate Logs

Logs are pretty simple, but they work for what they are. Sure, you could do much nicer and more detailed logs with real wood, but these are nice enough and easy to paint. So they work for me.

Mantic Terrain Crate, Hay Bales, Boxes, Crates

Similarly, bales of hay and wooden crates are fine. These single crates are detailed on 5 sides rather than 6, so they’ll always have the “grate” side on the top. I’m fine with that, but it’s just worth noting. The hay bales on the other hand are detailed on all six sides.

Mantic Terrain Crate, Boxes, Crates

The multi-crate stacks are pretty decent as well. They’re like a similar but larger version of the old resin ones that were sold by Grendel (and probably others) since the 1990’s. They’re pretty solid bits of scatter and can be used as background stuff in many genres of game or even as objective markers. I gave some of the individual boxes in the stack some (very) subtle differentiation with extra glazes of Flesh, Soft and Strong Tone, but wanted to keep them all pretty similar. Just enough variation so that the viewer doesn’t notice the variation while also adding enough small difference so that you don’t consciously notice that they all look exactly the same.

So while this might not be a super exciting post, and it’s certainly not a comprehensive review of the Terrain Crate stuff, but these pieces are the first that I’ve painted, and they’re all of solid quality – especially once painted. They’re not boutique resin-level quality, but for the price, they’re pretty nice. I’ll continue to offer my thoughts on the Terrain Crate stuff as I continue to work my way through them.

Zombicide: Black Plague – Broken Walls

Another real quick one today – it seems I forgot to post these back in April, though I did take the photo at the time. These are broken walls from the Zombicide Black Plague accessories pack (plastic tokens and whatnot).

I actually painted most of these last year sometime, and then (naturally) found two that had gotten missed. I don’t know how that sort of thing always manages to happen. (Those Shadows of Brimstone Tentacles had another bunch turn up recently, FFS!)

Anyway, they’re pretty simple. Too simple in fact, so I added some cat-litter-and-sand additional rubble. I left them all in grey to keep them nice and generic, and because adding weathering powders to this sort of glorified tokens would be a bit too far on the side of insane uses of my time. Here’s a photo to show the scale of these, in case I ever decide to use them in wargames, for which they’d be okay as movement-obstructing terrain or soft/light cover.

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Turrets

Here’s the next few models from my Sedition Wars Terrain Sets. I’ve featured some of this stuff before in the past, specifically the Barricades and the Crates.

As I’ve mentioned before in those posts, the add-on terrain set was the best part of that particular ill-fated Kickstarter campaign. I’ve got most of them in a storage tub, waiting for when I either want to knock out some bits and pieces or could use some of them for a game.

These got painted for the latter reason – while playing Imperial Assault, we ran into some turrets during one of the missions. Rather than the counters, we used the turrets I painted recently for Shadows of Brimstone, but I felt that they were a little big. With his in mind, I picked out four of the less-wonky Sedition Wars turrets (the articulated arms were glued down in the factory by indifferent workers) and eventually got to work.

As you can see, they’re simple, but decent enough models (feels like I write something like that pretty often lately!) I’m sure they can be used pretty easily in whatever kinds of sci-fi or near-future games as needed, but more importantly, if we run into any more turrets in IA, I’m prepared (I bet we won’t, now…)

Here’s a rough depiction of what seems to happen when we open the average door in IA. RUN! (and yes, we’re the using WotC figures for a lot of stuff while I slowly paint the “official” models.)

Mythic Battles: Pantheon – Ruined Pillars

Mythic Battles: Pantheon - Ruined Pillars

An unexciting one today. The ruined pillars from the Mythic Battles: Pantheon Kickstarter. While cleaning up some stuff the other week, I found the box shown below – and since a lot of scatter terrain is relatively quick and simple to paint up…
Mythic Battles: Pantheon - Ruined Pillars
I went for a slightly yellowed look rather than white marble based on some photos that image search turned up, along with the fact that they will mostly be used as outdoor ruins. Again, since they’re boardgame terrain I avoided really going to town with dirt, moss, vines and so forth as I might have in a diorama situation. Not quite as yellowed as the photo I’ve thrown up there, and I know the yellow/sandstone look can be a trick of the light – depending on where the photos are taken for the material they’re made of as well as the time of day – I’m going for a pretty generic emulation of that particular look, and the browns also provide the weathering.
Mythic Battles: Pantheon - Ruined Pillars
Since I don’t yet have any of the Mythic Battles figures painted yet, I took the showcase/size pic with a couple of Barbarians and a couple of Monolith’s Conan figures.

 

Shadows of Brimstone: Doorways Into Darkness (OtherWorld Doorways)

Shadows of Brimstone: Doorways Into Darkness (OtherWorld Doorways)

A couple of weeks ago I completed the Mine Doorways from the Shadows of Brimstone: Doorways Into Darkness set. This weekend, I painted the other half of that boxed set – the OtherWorld Doorways.

Shadows of Brimstone: Doorways Into Darkness (OtherWorld Doorways)

Once again, they’re pretty simple models, but nice enough for what they are. I took some inspiration from their suggested painting guide insofar as the greenish hue to the lower parts of the portal-like doorways, though I decided to paint the runes in a bright (glowing) green. I didn’t bother with OSL effects, because they’re good enough as is for boardgame doorways or potential wargame/roleplaying scenery items – as portals/etc. They certainly pass the four-foot test.

Another boxed accessory set complete!

Shadows of Brimstone: Doorways Into Darkness

Our scale models for the Doorways into Darkness are a trio of Conan’s Black Dragon bodyguards.

Zombicide: Green Horde – Hedges

Zombicide: Green Horde Hedges

I know that title sounds super-exciting, right? Basically, Wave 2 of my Zombicide Green Horde Kickstarter pledge finally arrived a week or so ago, and after having a look and poke around, I found that I’d ordered 2 sets of the 3D Plastic Hedges, as well as 2 sets of the 3D Plastic Obstacles.

Obviously, these will make games of Zombicide nicer looking (which I haven’t played in more than a year now – though to be fair we did play it weekly for a year or more). More obviously, these have a lot of potential use outside of the singular board game. Which even more completely obviously, is why I bought so many of the things.

Zombicide: Green Horde - Hedges

A Marine, Survivor and Reiksgard provide scale.

They looked pretty decent right out of the box – certainly good enough for boardgamers to enjoy. But that doesn’t cut it for us wargamers, so I sprayed them with a darker olive drab colour, then gave them a zenithal spray with a lighter green (both from my custom spray can collection). Marouda then told me that she didn’t think they were dark enough, so I decided to fix that with a dark wash. Since hitting 40 of these would use a bloody lot of wash (Athonian Camoshade, perhaps?) I decided to break out a couple of dropper bottles of my pre-mixed mediums and go the Les Bursley route of making my own – which is why I ended up posting Les’ tutorial here the other day.

Zombicide: Green Horde - Hedges

“Quantity has a quality all it’s own” – Uncle Joe (probably).

The first wash didn’t dry as dark as I would have liked, so I mixed up another, darker tone, and applied that to the lower-mid area of the hedges, and that seemed to do the job. Then a bright green drybrush, paint the rocks, dapple the rocks (I briefly considered the liquid greenstuff-dab technique to give them texture… but doing it on all those rocks across 40 hedges? – no thanks!

Zombicide: Green Horde - Hedges

There’s a decent amount of coverage with the hedges alone. Add in fences, buildings and scatter and there’s a good chunk of table sorted.

So then I gave them a dark wash, and called it a day after nixing the idea of another drybrush and then weathering powders. Again – commonsense. There’s 40 of these bloody things, and nobody is going to be staring too closely at the rocks on their bases.

Zombicide: Green Horde - Hedges

Enough to make a Hedge Maze, albeit a small one!

Gloss spray varnish, let cure for a day, then satin spray varnish – now they’re done! When you see me talk about a “significant” amount of scatter terrain as a project goal shortly, this is the sort of thing I envision. A couple of these isn’t much, but this many is a worthy task.

Zombicide: Green Horde - Hedges

Pretending to be the Bocage…

What I like is the fact that they can easily work across many genres and locales. Modern, Historical, 40k, urban, rural and well-maintained gardens. I can even see them being used for 15mm Bocage hedgerows as needed, since those Normandy hedgerows are huge!

A little shopping trip…

So with a public holiday yesterday, Marouda and I went out and saw Deadpool 2, which was fun. (Probably the funniest online review can be found here. 6min video. Beware, spoilers.)

Anyway, after that, we stopped in BigW, which is one of those discount department stores like Kmart or Target. While we were in there, we checked out the toy section. The $10 Star Wars Hot Wheels ship above is probably a tiny bit small for the actual Resistance Bomber in X-Wing, but Im sure we can use it as a proxy, or as a shuttle instead of the little card token, or even as a damaged ship “terrain” to replace an asteroid.

I also recently ordered Gaslands (should be here …soon!) and I wanted to look at the toy cars.

So we got these:

The above were all $2 each. (Yeah, we got 2 of the armoured cars.)

This triple pack was $6.50.

These Jurassic Park Armoured Cars were $4.00 each. $2.00 for the cars, and $2.00 for the licenced IP, I guess.

I also saw these Hot Wheels tracks there.

Which reminded me that I recently saw (what I think are) these very products in use as walkways on someone’s Necromunda table. I believe it was on someone’s blog, actually. As you can see, the size works for both 32mm and 25mm bases. They’re made from pretty soft/bendy PVC, though, so I’ll need to be careful with them.

So at $4 each… I picked up 5 sets. $20 for all the extra walkways I should ever need. With this many I can easily chop and shorten as many as I want to. Perhaps I can even glue a little circular bit onto some of my terrain to notch the walkways onto. Now I just need to find which locally-available (spray) paints will properly adhere to this soft and bendy PVC…

All in all, more of a preview post than anything else, but what (should be?) a Gaslands force each for Marouda and myself for $20.50, plus something for X-Wing and some Necro-scenery. Not too shabby.