Citadel Grave Guard – As Kings of War Wights (Neglected Model May ’18)

Citadel Grave Guard 6th Edition Vampire Counts

A (little) bit of a break from WarZone models today, however briefly (I have another two close to finished, so hopefully can get them done and posted over the next two days.)

A couple of years ago, around about September 2014 – I bought a whole bunch of Undead off Nerdfest over on Dakka. Amongst those were a bunch of Spirit Hosts which I rebased individually got got up and done within a day of receiving them. These models… not so much.

Blister photo via eBay.

Part of the Vampire Counts range from the early 2000’s, 2004-05 being the earliest reference I can easily find, they seem to have come in very specific blisters, since I keep finding the same trio when I was looking to find out more details about these models. That makes them models from the 6th Edition, so they could easily date back from as far as 2001, which was when the 6th Edition Warhammer Armies: Vampire Counts book was released.

Citadel Grave Guard 6th Edition Vampire Counts

Anyway, when I got them I thought they were decent models that could be pretty simply painted up. I suggested to Marouda that they’d be good models for her to paint up. She never showed much interest, so I got started on them myself. Of course, I didn’t exactly get them done quickly. I felt that as a trio of models that are quite different to everything else I have in sculpt style, and a re a bit bigger than the norm, I thought they could work well enough as a unit of three Wights in Kings of War. With that in mind, I mounted them on 32mm bases as opposed to the 25mm bases they came with. Wights are (now) on 40mm bases, but I’ll just build them a unit tray-base for KoW with the correct 40x120mm footprint.

Later.

Lord of the Rings Barrow-Wights. Yeah, that “OSL” is incredibly rough, but it was my first ever attempt.

Similarly, their paint scheme was informed by the scheme I used on the other unit of Wights, which is made up of two Lord of the Rings Barrow-Wights and a single Army of the Dead plastic model in the same paint scheme. Spectral blue-green robes (yes, these are more blue-blue-green than the previous set), metal weaponry and armour, and the creature inside looking roughly how they might look that far into their death.

Citadel Grave Guard 6th Edition Vampire Counts

So here, I’ve followed that with the robes, but the leather coifs and cuirass straps looked a bit silly in spectral blue-green, so instead I went with dark grey instead, over other choices like leather browns. Being in that awkward space between the metal armour and the spectral cloth, dark grey-black was good enough to fit in without drawing too much attention to it.

Citadel Grave Guard 6th Edition Vampire Counts

Shields came from a mid-point range of GW’s Chaos Warriors. Following the old-school, Realm of Chaos models with their open-hole shields but before the range went all-plastic. Given the skull-tastic designs on all three, I nicked them out of my shields tub for these undead fellows instead.

Citadel Chaos Beastmen Gors (Michael Perry, 1995-6)

Chaos Chaos Beastmen Gors (Michael Perry, 1995-6) Citadel Miniatures Warhammer Fantasy

Regular readers will know that I’m a bit of an Oldhammerer, and I’ve got a decent collection of the original Realm of Chaos models, including beastmen of the chaos dieties, and even some of the Beastman Champions of Chaos models.

As much as I love those older models (many sculpted by Jes Goodwin), my favourite series of Beastmen that were sculpted in a consistent manner are Michael Perry’s line of goat-headed models, initially sculpted and released in the mid-1990’s. These models were later specified as “Gors”, and joined by Ungors, Bestigors, Centigors and so on – as they became the template of all non-specifically-aligned beastmen in Warhammer lore right up to current times. While the recent return of Tzaangor were a welcome release, and we await Khorngor and Slaangor (and wonder what happened to the anticipated Pestigor), these have become the archetypical Games Workshop Beastmen – and yes, they’re still pretty much Broo in their heritage and lineage.

Chaos Chaos Beastmen Gors (Michael Perry, 1995-6) Citadel Miniatures Warhammer Fantasy

Shields are taken from the later, plastic line of beastmen. I like those models a lot as well, though not as much as these earlier metals. Their shields, however are perfect for these and convey a nice, wild and feral feel much more effectively than the standard plastic shields of the day.

If it were next month, these three would count as Neglected Models. I don’t remember when I started them, or even why. But April has been a tough month for painting motivation, and I’ve not gotten a whole lot done. Certainly nothing like I’d planned. I’ve assembled a bunch of smaller models, rather than something especially large and impressive – and worse – nothing that I really want to show off or share here on the blog in their current states. So turning to a few older models still sitting on the desk and getting them complete has at least given me the chance to feel a little bit productive.

Rogue Idol of Gork (or possibly Mork): Forge World/Warhammer Forge (Monster March ’18)

Rogue Idol of Gork (or possibly Mork): Forge World

Here’s my final entry for the Monster March painting challenge being run by Swordmaster over at Path of an Outcast. As I noted yesterday when I posted up the giant Burrower, I had to shelve the idea of getting that Dracoliche and Bone Giant finished this month when I got sick, and so turned to a pair of models that didn’t need quite as much finesse to paint. The first was of course the Borrower, that I shared a couple of days ago. That one was painted start-to-finish, by virtue of being a rather simple model.

Rogue Idol of Gork (or possibly Mork): Forge World

This one, while equally a big bastard, is actually a lot more complex. Or to put it another way, allows for more of a complex paint job, while still keeping it rather simple. You could easily get away with a straightforward spray black/grey and drybrush the hell out of the thing, and end up with a decent looking model. I tried that initially, but it didn’t do it for me. Or more precisely, I didn’t think it was appropriate for this model – for me, anyway. More on that a little later.

Rogue Idol of Gork (or possibly Mork): Forge World

I originally picked this thing up several years ago with a thought to using it in Kings of War, using a “Giant” Profile or some such and running it alongside my Orcs. As such, I’d planned to give it a square base and so forth. I actually started to paint it in December, with a thought to using it as a personal “Stretch Goal” for Painting Decembuary, but given how December turned out, it didn’t get finished, and then just sat around for a couple of months, occasionally having a bit more done to it before I put it aside again. I had it based on a large oval base at one point, as I think that’s how the reissued version from Forge World comes, but I wasn’t entirely sure at the time, and so ordered a bunch of large bases from Reaper. When they arrived in April, I wrenched him off the oval and glued him down to the large circle, and it slowly took shape from there.

Rogue Idol of Gork (or possibly Mork): Forge World

On not wanting to keep the paint simple, I have a rationale – See, this model is a great big expensive chunk of Forge World resin. If I’m going to (yeah, foolishly) pay that sort of money for a single model, then I want to make sure I’m really doing it justice. There are a whole lot of glyphs carved onto the model. Some of the original studio paintjobs pretty much ignore them, but the current Forge World paintjob overdoes the colourfulness of the model, if not the glyphs. With this in mind, I painted them with thinned-down transparent paints from Warcolors, and finished them later by drybrushing my top-layer stone colour over them to make them stand out a little less and give them an old, worn look.

Rogue Idol of Gork (or possibly Mork): Forge World

After all of the rock painting was done, it was time to sort out the sculpted-on moss. I really hate sculpted-on moss. It tends to look shitty if painted. (The moss on the new Forge World studio example is positively glowing). So you’re left with pretending that it’s stone and ignoring it, painting it green and trying to ignore how bad it looks, or trying to do something with it by covering it – which is what I’ve done before and attempted again here. I’m not 100% sure if it’s the right choice, but it looks better to me than the other two options (that happened to be stages on the path to this.) Now he looks a bit like Moss Man from Masters of the Universe. So… hrm. So yeah, I wish they would skip the sculpted-on moss.

Rogue Idol of Gork (or possibly Mork): Forge World

The plan was to post this guy up yesterday, but it was close to midnight when I got the last of the flock onto him, as it took several applications. The stuff then had to dry, and, well, you get the idea. Easier to let it dry properly and then post him up in the morning. In the end, thanks to this painting challenge, I’ve gotten motivated enough to finally finish this model, giving me a second large beastie worthy of the moniker “Monster March”. There aren’t really any easy 40k stats for him (maybe a Greater Daemon without wings or spells?) but he’ll be usable in both Kings of War and Age of Sigmar. Right when I get around to playing either of them again.

Realm of Chaos – Nurgle’s Children 2018 #11: Scotia Grendel Dungeon Crawler & Devout Tormented

Scotia Grendel Dungeon Crawler & Chronopia Devout Tormented

Time for some March Posts, finally! This pair of model has been showcased before when I first completed them – the Leech in October 2014 and the Tormented in July 2015. The leech is one of three figures from the Scotia Grendel Dungeon Crawlers kit that I picked up bout 15-20 years ago. The big dude is probably unfamiliar to most readers, being a Devout Tormented from the Chronopia line of the mid-late 1990’s. Chronopia was essentially Heartbreaker’s take on Fantasy Skirmish following on from the Success of WarZone. It came in a two-pack with a resin-metal demon-centaur… thing that had some awful connection points.

Scotia Grendel Dungeon Crawler & Chronopia Devout Tormented

Originally the leech had no specific purpose aside from getting the thing painted. You know the sort of thing – generic D&D-ish monster for RPGs and narrative miniatures gaming and such that never actually gets used. The Tormented was originally to be a Daemon Prince in the first version of my Nurgle Chaos Cult force, that I sorta created based on some 3rd-4th edition rules (Lost & the Damned). In the current force the leech will be a Beast of Nurgle (I don’t care that the model’s physical profile is radically different – just compare the GW Beast models over the years!) and the Tormented will make a decent Chaos Spawn – in profile/stats at least. Think of him as a Daemon Prince that’s failed Papa Nurgle in the worst way and has been cursed to continue serving his Patron in such a state. You might have thought Khorne would be more appropriate – but just look at that horn. He’s gotta be Nurglesque! And the viscera fits as well.

My first take on a Nurgle Cult force.

While neither of these models has an outstanding paintjob or anything, I’m happy enough with what they are – a pair of decent looking older models that have had the smallest amount of touch-up, and have been rebased onto higher-lipped bases with some rocks and tufts added to them in order to make both figures fit in better with the Nurgle Daemon force – so they now both have a home.

That’s good enough for me!

Realm of Chaos – Nurgle’s Children 2018 #10: The Army So Far (End Feb ’08)

So this is the state of the army now, two months into 2018. Four packs of Plaguebearers, two Beasts of Nurgle, 1 Daemon Prince of Nurgle (represented by the original GUO), 1 Great Unclean One and Mamon the Transfigured. I’m not even going to worry about “proper” points at this stage, but it comes to a Power Level of 54 for 8th edition 40k, so we’re getting towards a decent sized force – though a ton of those points come from the Great Unclean One.

Realm of Chaos – Nurgle’s Children 2018 #9: 3rd Wave Plaguebearers (Again!) (2001) 3rd Wave Plaguebearer Command (2007). #Squaduary Painting Challenge Success. #Fembruary Painting Challenge Success.

3.5 Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle Command 2007

If you’re sick of Plaguebearer posts, you’re not alone. I’m sick of them myself. The good news then is that this post represents the last of all my metal Plaguebearers painted and completed. Sure, I’ve got a ton of plastics to paint up at some stage, but since I ain’t touching my plastic kits until ALL of the older metal is done, we have a reprieve.

2nd Wave Plaguebearer of Nurgle 1995/6, 3rd Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle 2001

2nd Wave Plaguebearer of Nurgle 1995/6, 3rd Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle 2001

I’m sure they’ll still feature in some other posts. I should do an “Nurgle Daemon Army-so-far” post sometime soon and I’ll do a personal Squaduary wrap-up in the next few days, though I still need to put the final, finishing touches on the Wolfpack first. I’ll do the same for Fembruary, though that will be closer to the end of the month, or even the first weekend in March, since the month ends on a Wednesday and then I’ll need a few days to photograph and then write up a blog post. And of course, there will be my final February wrap-up post encompassing everything I got finished this month, but after that I can only see them turning up in batreps or subsequent “Nurgle Daemon Army-so-far” posts as the force continues to build up.

Realm of Chaos Lost and the Damned Original Oldhammer Plaguebearers Kev Adams, 1991, 2nd Wave Plaguebearers of Nurgle 1995/6, 3rd Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle 2001, 3.5 Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle Command 2007

Here they are, united with the original batches of “green” Plaguebearers.

 

 

Realm of Chaos – Nurgle’s Children 2018 #8: More 3rd Wave Plaguebearers (2001) 3rd Wave Plaguebearer Command (2007). #Squaduary Painting Challenge Success (Again). #Fembruary Painting Challenge Success (Again).

 

2nd Wave Plaguebearers of Nurgle 1995/6, 3rd Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle 2001, 3.5 Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle Command 2007

Okay. We’ve had the Green Plaguebearers and the Tan Plaguebearers, it’s time for the Brown Plaguebearers. As with the last Plaguebearer post last week, the batch is made up of a mixture of the 3rd wave metals, with a couple of 2nd wave metals, and the shitty 2007 3.5 wave command trio.

3.5 Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle Command 2007

3.5 Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle Command 2007

I already shared my opinion on these in the last Plaguebearer post. Suffice to say, if you think these look okay, then I’ve managed to successfully slightly polish a trio of turds. That and we’re looking at them from their most favourable angles here. The pointing finger was missing from the Champion/Plagueridden, so I used a “bone axe” hand from a Shieldwolf Mountain Orc as a replacement.

3rd Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle 2001, Aly Morrison

3rd Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle 2001, Aly Morrison

Since posting up the previous batch of Plaguebearers, I’ve found that not only did Aly Morrison sculpt these 3rd Wave models (which are a mixed bag – my favourite three are above) and those embarrassingly awful abominations of a command group, but he also sculpted the original Great Unclean One, which stands as a timeless classic (to me, anyway). Talk about an uneven resume.

2nd Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle 1996, Aly Morrison/Colin Dixon

2nd Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle 1996, Aly Morrison/Colin Dixon

Here’s a pair of 2nd Wave Plaguebearers. I never liked these compared to the originals, or even the 3rd wave models. They always struck me as a series of unnecessary resculpts. In that they looked quite close to the originals, while still being noticeably inferior. I always assumed their main reason for existence was because Kev Adams had moved on (or been moved on?) from GW. Not sure if that’s true or not, but this range still seems to me to be one of the more redundant series of models ever released. Sculpts are by either Aly Morrison, Colin Dixon, or both, depending on where you look, as I’ve found them both individually credited for this range as well as “and-credited” for this range.

3rd Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle 2001, Aly Morrison

3rd Wave Warhammer Plaguebearers of Nurgle 2001, Aly Morrison

I ended up with an awful lot of that hunched-over Plaguebearer, so here’s a pair in brown along with a friend. The overall palette and techniques for these guys was pretty much identical to the tan and the green, just with a different base colour, hightlight and shade for the core flesh. The discolourations, tentacles, horns, bone, wounds, etc were all done in the exact same way, which will unify them nicely with their fellows I think.

As with the last set of Plaguebearers I painted, I’ll call this another completed submission for Alex’ Fembruary Painting Challenge 2018 as well as the Squaduary Painting Challenge. I’ve still got a few more Plaguebearers to show (I finished them concurrently with these ones), so now I can shift painting gears a little and try to finish some other models before the month ticks out. I’ve still got that pack of 9 wolves that I’d like to complete for Squaduary, as well as the Dark Elf Sorceress and the Escher to complete for a more traditional set of models for Fembruary.

And then there’s the two Ork Nobs that are all I need to complete their two Mobs.

Of course, the “to paint” list is endless, but it’s good to have the next few targets decided on…