WAAAAGH! Pt.8: 40k Ork Slugga Boyz – Autumn Platenenmuster Style #2

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

So here’s the next trio of Orks. As I stated in the previous Ork-Post, I wasn’t entirely satisfied with how the Autumn Platenenmuster camo from the video guide came out, and while I was poking around the internets, I found another method detailed on Warlord Games’ site, which provided me with the basis for what you see here.

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

I haven’t attempted to minimise the size of the dots in the camo pattern here – instead going for a slightly larger size that suits these particular models.

Quite different, as you can see in this comparison shot – and distinct enough so that I can use both on my Ork force going forward in order to keep up that variety of camo patterns across their “uniforms”. This leaves me with only 7 more Orks left to go from this 500 (or 600?) point combat patrol force that I started in 2005. Two Rokkits, one Big Shoota, two Nobz and a Warboss. Plus a squig, and a whole lotta grots. The grots are well on their way, but need to be rebased to match the Orks… (groan!)

 

 

 

 

WAAAAGH! Pt.7: 40k Ork Slugga Boyz – Autumn Platenenmuster Style #1

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

Yeah, more Ork Slugga boyz. That’s how it works, I guess, when you’re painting a horde army yet wanting to make every model pretty unique. Once again we have a mix of Fantasy and 40k Ork parts that built these four. Several of these were painted black, and it looked decent, but… I was thinking that I should probably save the black (and black camo types) for the Kommandos and similar elites.

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

So they sat again in limbo while I tried to figure out how to paint them. Who should come to my rescue but Warlord Games – in one of their recent newsletters on the 2nd November, they featured a tutorial video by The War Gamer on painting German Plane Tree Autumn Camo. After a few days I got around to watching it, and decided it looked distinct enough from what I already had – and importantly – distinct from the green Ork skin, so worth giving a shot, especially since I picked up the full range of Army Painter paints recently, so I had all of the colours.

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

As you can see, it worked out… reasonably well. Not as nice as I’d hoped – and my concerns about the washes muddying the detail indeed came to light. Still, it looks decent, and so I’m happy enough with it. I also found another method to paint the same camo, also on Warlord’s site – which I have been using on the next batch of Orks. Finished soon (probably).

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

In some fairly pleasant news, after painting these four, I’m almost down to single digits on the number of Orks outstanding from my initial combat patrol force from 2005. Of course, that includes the Nobz and Warlord, so they’ll take a little longer. And not counting the grotz…  and then there’s plenty more Orks to paint after that!  But them ones following will be “new” ones joining the force, and some more Oldhammer Orks. Maybe I should get onto the Diggas I started back in the day and get them finished before starting a whole lot more new stuff?

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

A note to Ann – this is what I mean by washes over the top muddying up the camo (there’s an actual pattern under there). Still, these guys were essentially following the directions for a recipe, and I was taught the first time that you follow the recipe for something quite new, to follow them precisely – and then very it to taste the next time. Funny, the other guide from WLG has resulted in a pattern that looks NOTHING like this, despite them both being for Autumn Platenenmuster…

Orktober 2017 Finale: Group Shot!

Rogue Trader-era Kev Adams Space Orks, Oldhammer, Brian Nelson 40k Slugga Boyz

A quick and dirty post today – Just something fun to show off all of the Orks that I’ve recently painted in a group shot. Da Boyz are certainly back in town! By the time their codex comes out, I’m hoping that I should be well on my way to a small (points-wise) but playable force. I’m quite pleased how well the Orks from such different eras work together as a group. Consistent basing and an overall shared palette/theme really make a difference!

Orktober 2017 #6/WAAAAGH! Pt.6: 40k Ork Slugga Boyz.

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

And yep, another three Orks today. I figured that I could have shown all six in one post on a 2-day turnaround, or just post them three at a time over two days. So I’m doing the latter to give them all a bit more space. Besides, they took me long enough to get finished, so I’m good with giving them a bit more individual showcase. It’s not like it’ll happen for these models again as any new posts with them will either be much larger group shots or battle reports, so I’ll give the hours of work these guys took their moment in the spotlight. 😛

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

As with yesterday’s camo schemes, we’ve got British Desert DPM and three variations on that Yugoslav “puzzle” pattern, all with different palettes. The idea is that when these Orks are all mixed together, they’ll all be unique yet unified by their camo gear. Besides, even with Blood Axes, I can’t see Orks being better at wearing unified camo than, say Russian troops. 😉

Orktober 2017 #5/WAAAAGH! Pt.5: 40k Ork Slugga Boyz.

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

Three more Slugga Boyz again today. I literally finished these off yesterday, so I bumped them up in the blog post queue so I could “Orktober” them. (I’ve gone from having not much to show to a backlog of stuff to show again.) Not much to write here that I haven’t already said before. A mix of 40k and Fantasy bits used again, as well as muted palette and camo schemes.

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

Our leftmost Ork wears UK Desert DPM, the middle one wears an AUSCAM top with a made-up camo on his pants, and the third Ork has that same made-up camo on his top and a different made-up camo for his pants. Both of the “made-up” camo schemes are (loosely) based on the Yugoslav variant of the “puzzle” pattern of camouflage – though both with 3-colours and my own arid-themed palettes.

WAAAAGH! Pt.4: GorkaMorka Slaver a.k.a. Ork Runtherd (1998)

Citadel GorkaMorka Slaver, 40k Ork Runtherd, Brian Nelson (1998)

A bit of a slow week this last couple of weeks for posts as I had exhausted my backlog of recently-painted-but-unshown models, and to be blunt had a bit of the old blogging-burnout. I’ll slowly catch up on people’s posts and keep on painting here to get more new models finished. Still, I do have something today – one of the models I’d planned to complete a couple of weekends ago but only managed to do during the week. This guy is from the GorkaMorka range, which was a side game of GW’s (now known as “Specialist Games”) and the sort-of successor and replacement for Necromunda in their release schedule. GM never took off like Necromunda did, and my group never actually played it at all, which I felt was a shame, since it looked like a fair bit of fun. I did, however pick up a ton of GM kits, which I guess might start to be assembled and painted now that I’m resurrecting the Orks.

Citadel GorkaMorka Slaver, 40k Ork Runtherd, Brian Nelson (1998)

Palette-wise, I kept him fairly simple and muted. A robe that started as off-white before being dirtied up quite a bit, some leather gubbins and the old Pilot’s cap all in browns finished him off.

Of course, Bruce Spence’s iconic character of the Gyro Captain is a visible inspiration for this figure’s look – not to mention several other Orks through the years. Of course, Mad Max 2 has been a huge influence over much of popular culture in general and 40k in particular – and especially so for Orks. I mean Just Look Anywhere.

Citadel GorkaMorka Slaver, 40k Ork Runtherd, Brian Nelson (1998)

Ork Slavers are generally also called Runtherds, and have been so since the RT days. One thing that is for sure is this figure was called “Ork Slaver” for it’s GM release. So this means there’s something missing here!

Citadel GorkaMorka Slaver, 40k Ork Runtherd, Brian Nelson (1998)

Now at this stage I don’t have any runts ready for this guy to herd …yet. But rest assured, when they get sorted out, this guy will make an appropriate reappearance here on the blog.

Citadel GorkaMorka Slaver, 40k Ork Runtherd, Brian Nelson (1998)

He’s comin’ ta getcha!

WAAAAGH! Pt.3: 40k Ork Slugga Boyz.

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

Another three Slugga Boyz today. I’d have potentially had something different to show but I ended up spending most of yesterday Spring Cleaning the house, so these three are all I have finished at the moment. The Ork on our left is fully kitted in Coffee Stain (DCU) camo, while both of his comrades wear Auscam (DPCU) on their lower half. The Boy with the chainsaw above his head has a British 2-Colour Desert DPM vest while the third Ork wears Australian “Desert Auscam” (DPDU) (v.3).

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

Once again, there are some fantasy Orc bits mixed in, but that’s par for the course at this stage.

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

Here are the Orks I’ve finished so far. Not too many (at all!) by Ork standards, being a horde army – but I’m happy with each of the models, and like the Vikings before them, each model is an individual. I’m really pleased with the way they’re turning out, especially since they were pretty much a forgotten, long-shelved project for literally over a decade. The sort of thing that you’d like to get back to but don’t think you necessarily ever will.

Finally, with everything happening in the world in the last little while, I’d just like to give my best wishes to everyone to stay safe and look after one another. We as individuals can’t do anything about NK, but having seen Harvey, Katia, Chiapas and Irma devastate so many places in the last few days, with Irma far from finished and Jose still on the way there’s been an awful lot so far but still a lot to come, so stay as safe as you can.