Legion of the Damned #5: Rogue Trader-Era RT01 (Aly Morrison, 1988)

Legion of the Damned Rogue Trader-Era RT01 (Aly Morrison, 1988) Oldhammer

It’s been quite awhile since I’ve posted (or painted) any more Legion of the Damned models, but today we have a pair of them – finished as part of Mechanismo May (after missing the end of Armoured April). The biggest reason my Legion of the Damned has petered out so much is because I tend to have a few models from my various projects on the go at any given time, and I like to finish the WIP ones before allowing myself to start more. That way, starting the new models are a “reward” of sorts for completing the previous batch. It takes awhile, but it does work out a lot better than my previous method of just starting new models all of the time, that appears to have just given me a thousand or so neglected models to wade through.

Legion of the Damned Rogue Trader-Era RT01 (Aly Morrison, 1988) Oldhammer

So why, dear reader, did it take me so long to get through this pair? Well, the answer is that I don’t actually like either of these models very much. As much as I like the character of the old Beakies from the Rogue Trader days, my personal aesthetics go with Mark Copplestone and Bob Naismith’s renditions, and the Aly Morrison ones – with their short, blunt helmets and extra-hunched poses are a distant followup. So with that, they can be a real chore to paint, and so this pair has taken me well over a year to get done. I can’t even remember when I began on them, quite frankly.

This pair were chosen for the Legion because of their sculpted details. The skull-shoulder studs and knee-skulls on the first “Brother Morris”, and the big-ass shoulder-skull on the second. Also, being Aly Morrison sculpts, I can “hide” the soft details on their helms to an extent by freehanding skulls on them.

Legion of the Damned Rogue Trader-Era RT01 (Aly Morrison, 1988) Oldhammer

In the end, these models have come up decently, and I am now happy enough with them to incorporate them in with the rest of my Legion. It’s that thing I’ve encountered a fair bit where through the painting process, I really quite dislike the model(s) I’m working on, but once completed, I’m pleased enough with the final result that I no longer resent the models, and can even quite like them in their final form. With a Multi-Melta and Plasma Gun between them, I have the Special and Heavy weapons for a squad here, so I’ll have to check my existing painted models and work out a Sergeant and 7 Legionaries to go with them to fill out another game-friendly squad.

Space Marine “Warriors of the Imperium” (1992-3): Dauntless December ’18

Space Marine "Warriors of the Imperium" (1992-3)

This model was built and painted originally over 20 years ago, when the “new” Mk7 Space Marines had their first multipart plastic kit released in 1992-3 or so following the metal Space Marine Strike Force (and long before the more familiar multipart kit from the 40k 3rd edition Starter box. It was known as “Warriors of the Imperium”

Space Marine "Warriors of the Imperium" (1992-3)

Anyway, I saw a converted model, essentially the same model – either in White Dwarf or converted by someone local. The original version had a metal head used, and possibly a metal torso and legs, but featured the same kind of converted skull-backpack, pointing finger and a broadly similar head. I made mine from the the aforementioned plastic marine kit, along with a plastic Imperial Guard head, and the skulls were taken from HeroQuest decorative Skulls, cut down and modified to become power armour vents.

Space Marine "Warriors of the Imperium" (1992-3)

What this guy is exactly, I couldn’t tell you. It kind of feels like a distant ancestor to the Deathwatch, and certainly GW of the day would slap different names onto random marines like Doom Eagle, or even as captions in White Dwarf, so it’s entirely possible that there was some relationship there. I (briefly) considered replacing the left arm and/or pauldron blinging him out as a modern DW marine, but I think he works better simply rebased on a 32mm, and with the rest of him as a kind of restored time capsule. I did tone down his bright yellow Bolt Pistol, though!

Space Marine "Warriors of the Imperium" (1992-3)

Since he’s a (late) Rogue Trader-era model, he also qualifies as “Oldhammer”, though not original-era RT. As for the current edition, he doesn’t really fit in well as anything. No matter, I can always use him to proxy as some kind of low-level hero. Perhaps a Lieutenant. I guess that makes him Dauntless!

There’s now only one more model to complete my December output – see you in about 24 hours for December’s exciting conclusion!

Realm of Chaos – Nurgle’s Children 2018 #1: Kev Adams Plaguebearers (1991)

Realm of Chaos Lost and the Damned Original Oldhammer Plaguebearers Kev Adams

These Plaguebearer models were released as part of the initial “proper” waves of Nurgle models back in 1991, alongside the seminal Warhammer rulebook – Realm of Chaos: The Lost and the Damned. If you’re at all interested in the background and artwork that got us to where we are today in terms of Chaos and how it fits in with Warhammer Fantasy, Age of Sigmar and Warhammer 40,000, I strongly suggest getting hold of both Slaves to Darkness and The Lost and the Damned. Obviously the books are hard to get hold of – especially on eBay, but they’re worth it. I believe that Forge World is reprinting them for some special events this year, and of course, with this being the internet, .pdf files of them exist. Though of course, I’m sure that if you picked up a copy in this manner, you’d be careful to ensure that you already owned them in book form first.

Anyway, these five are all I have of the initial release. There are 11 sculpts, counting variations and not counting the “Combat Card” Plaguebearer that was never officially released. I’d love to pick up the others, but with Oldhammer being the cool, trendy-retro thing that it’s become, it has gotten much harder to pick up older models in the last few years. I always especially wanted Woundlicker, Snotsprayer and Wormrot, so we’ll see if I manage to get hold of them one day…

Realm of Chaos Lost and the Damned Original Oldhammer Plaguebearers Kev Adams

Many aspects of Nurgle that remain to this day can be seen on these figures, from the Nurglings capering around their bigger cousins’ legs to the overall appearance. The “joy” that followers of Nurgle hold so strongly is evident in several of their faces, though the dour expressions that have come to typify Plaguebearers specifically can be seen on Vomitrot, who just looks like a miserable bastard.

Of course, the faces of these old Plaguebearers have a striking similarity to those of the Orcs (and Orks) of the day, in that they’re very clearly Kev Adams sculpts, and he seems to have simply given them pretty standard Kev Adams Ork faces and maws, albeit with a cyclopean eye, mono-horn and a more human-ish nose. The similarity also extends across to the work he did for Heartbreaker on a good amount of WarZone’s range, including the Necromutants that will also be (re)drafted into one of my 8th edition 40k forces. Poxwalkers, perhaps?

These figures will be paired with other Plaguebearers from later range refreshes and have a lot of potential use across a number of games. In 40k they fit into the Nurgle Daemons or more general Daemonic army, they’re used as troops in the Death Guard Legion force, they can be used in Age of Sigmar and even in Kings of War in an Abyssal force. And those are just the obvious used for wargames

Orktober 2017 Finale: Group Shot!

Rogue Trader-era Kev Adams Space Orks, Oldhammer, Brian Nelson 40k Slugga Boyz

A quick and dirty post today – Just something fun to show off all of the Orks that I’ve recently painted in a group shot. Da Boyz are certainly back in town! By the time their codex comes out, I’m hoping that I should be well on my way to a small (points-wise) but playable force. I’m quite pleased how well the Orks from such different eras work together as a group. Consistent basing and an overall shared palette/theme really make a difference!

C100 Space Marines “Capt. Huron Grimm”, Fallen Dark Angel – 40k Rogue Trader (1988)

C100 Space Marines "Capt. Huron Grimm", Fallen Dark Angel - 40k Rogue Trader (1988), Oldhammer

The third member of my small collection of Rogue Trader Marines in the heavily-scuffed livery of the Original Dark Angels – to be used as Fallen Angels in modern gaming. This chainsaw-wielding lunatic with the wild hair was first sighted by myself in Chapter Approved: The Book of the Astronomican, back in the day. As The Fallen are old. Really, really old, despite the machinations of time within the Warp, I mixed grey in with the brown of his hair, and moreso on the highlights. I also had those old “Motörhead” facial hair pictures of Andy Chambers in mind while painting his hair.

C100 Space Marines "Capt. Huron Grimm", Fallen Dark Angel - 40k Rogue Trader (1988), Oldhammer

His helmet got the appropriate old-school treatment of a red stripe, though I left the eye lenses dark, as the helm is obviously not going to be active while it’s mag-locked to his hip. Despite only having painted three of these guys, I’ve really enjoyed doing each one of them (once I forced myself to finally get going on the long-started-and-stalled Brother Holt, anyway).

C100 Space Marines "Capt. Huron Grimm", Fallen Dark Angel - 40k Rogue Trader (1988), Oldhammer

The old-school-inspired palette combined with a bit of the Forge World-style penchant for weathering makes these guys really quick and simple to paint, while still looking great. Of course, there are more modern touches such as weapon casings not exclusively being drybrushed silver and the basing (I might add some powders to them once the entire force is complete for consistency). I’ll keep this style unique to this force which will keep them visually distinct from my other forces, and I have concerns that if I were to use the “dark & scuffed” look on too many other forces, they could easily start to look samey. There is another force I’ll be working on in future who might get weathered and scuffed armour, though the armour certainly won’t be black or near-black as these guys are.

C100 Space Marines "Capt. Huron Grimm", RT101 "Brother Napier", Brother Holt". Fallen Dark Angels, 40k Rogue Trader (1988), Oldhammer

Here’s the trio so far. One of the hardest parts of this force is finding figures that will fit in. I’ve only got a limited number of the old metal RT marines around, I’ve got very specific places that some of them are destines for, and on top of that – sometimes they go missing, such as another trio I’d planned to add to The Fallen. I could easily add some plastic RTB01 marines, I suppose – though I don’t want to overdo the use of those here, either. Maybe a couple of them can fit in, I guess – though I’m (apparently) going for more of a close combat oriented squad here. I do plan to drop in some modern DA parts mixed with older armour marks, Calth marines and some Forge World DA parts down the line, but I’d much prefer to finish off some more of the old metals first.

Orktober 2017 #3: RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master Thrugg Bullneck (1988)

RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master (1988) Kev Adams Rogue Trader Orks

I know, I know. The title “discipline-master” makes it seem like this orc should be the one armed with the whip and not the other Ork I posted up. This guy, known as Thrugg Bullneck (thanks Alex – I couldn’t recall his name despite looking for it) is the commander model from the very first Space Ork boxed set (and the second 40k box set ever) RTB02 Space Ork Raiders. In (the original volume of) Chapter Approved: Book of the Astronomican, this model and the other like him were the example models for Discipline Master (Sub-Chief) who had Ork Hero level stats. While he’s not huge compared to modern Brian Nelson Orks, he stands high over the rest of the models from the Space Ork Raiders box.

RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master (1988) Kev Adams Rogue Trader Orks

For his camo I’ve given him Desert Auscam, and attempted to give his gear some contrast to his skin by using reddish leather trim and brass/copper/bronze for his bling and scale armour – but without going all the way to actual red. Rather than going with the traditional old-school red for his plasma pistol, I went with a more muted dark turquiose. It still (sort of) stands out from the rest of his gear, but without being garish against his camo and overall more muted tones.

RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master (1988) Kev Adams Rogue Trader Orks

Looking at this model even then, but especially today the closed pose of it really stands out. Arms and weapons folded around the Ork’s torso, yet it still manages to look like a badass that you would not want to mess with. As with most Orks of the day, rather than boots, he’s got puttees wrapped around his feet from his toes almost to his knees. This was Kev Adams’ style on the fantasy orcs that he sculpted in those days, and something that directly carried over to almost all of the original Ork line.

RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master (1988) Kev Adams Rogue Trader Orks

This particular model is one I’ve had for decades, since I was a young teen first discovering the original Rogue Trader. One of the first 40k models I ever collected. The rest of his original cohorts were sold off many years ago, but he was one I kept out of fondness. He’s been painted (in enamels) then stripped, then boxed, then bagged, then boxed again into storage. With a lot of years in each of those. After so many years, he’s back, rebased on a 32, and most importantly painted and ready for the table again!

RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master (1988), Ork Mek, Mekaniak, Rogue Trader Orks, Kev Adams

And for good measure, here’s the three old-school Rogue Trader Orks together. I hope to get some more of these guys done this year, but the painting queue is pretty full, so I’ll make myself finish more of the other Orks I started years ago before I begin any more old-school Orks from scratch!

Orktober 2017 #2: Rogue Trader-era Kev Adams Space Ork Mekaniak (440206 – April 1989)

Rogue Trader Kev Adams Space Ork Mekaniak Mekboy April 1989

What? Dreadtober? Yeah, I’m working on that, too. Just clearing some stuff off the paint desk first, though.. This particular Ork happens to be the very first Ork Mekboy. Known initially at the time as a “Mekaniak” “Mek Boy” and “Mekboy”, he came included in a kit with the first Wartrak and a field gun, also known around the same time as a “Hop Splat Gun”. When I sold off most of my Orks back in the day, this fellow was one of the figures that I kept, along with the pair of gretchin slaves that go with him. (I need to dig them out and paint them up!)

Rogue Trader Kev Adams Space Ork Mekaniak Mekboy April 1989

This particular Ork was originally painted back in the day, stripped, and then stored in various boxes and cases for the next few decades. As with his companion that I shared here the other day, he’s finally out and painted to a standard that I’m happy with – and he’ll be joining the WAAAGH at some stage as well. While it’s certainly true that he’s pretty basic by the standards of modern Mekboys, I’ll have a good look through the Index (or maybe Codex, if it comes out this year – fingers crossed) and see if there’s a suitable spot for him. The whip makes him a potential Runtherd, though I think I’m well covered for that spot, at least for the time being.

Rogue Trader Kev Adams Space Ork Mekaniak Mekboy April 1989

Once again, bare metal, earth tones and camo are what make up the colours of his gear. His ammo pouches seem to be modelled after the FG-42 pouches and webbing, right down to the Y-harness – which makes a lot of sense I guess, as Orks from the originals through to part of second edition weren’t shy about taking inspiration for some of their elements from German sources. (Stormboys obviously being the most egregious example.)

Rogue Trader Kev Adams Space Ork Mekaniak Mekboy April 1989

Regardless, I always really liked this sculpt and even to this day I still love it. There’s just something so impassive and at the same time brutal and threatening about it. Not a figure that needs to be overblown to impart a sense of menace.