Discount Gorechosen? AoS Starter Khorne Bloodreaver Hero

Age of Sigmar Starter Khorne Bloodreaver Hero

In the last couple of years under the direction of new CEO, Kevin Rountree, Games Workshop has seemingly remembered that it’s a games company. The results of that has been a flood of new boxed games, most of which have been for the dual purpose of bundling models – i.e: Discounting their overpriced models without actually, officially discounting and also to produce games, which are giving their rules writers some chops and experience in, you know, rules writing. Happily, many of these products are actually good games by all reports.

Age of Sigmar Starter Khorne Bloodreaver Hero

One of these games I’ve picked up is Gorechosen. The game where Khorne’s champions beat one another to death in an arena setting in a very-much-beer-and-pretzels style game that’s reminiscent of a WWE Royal Rumble kind of thing. Well, more like a Fatal Four-Way Elimination match to nitpick, but I digress. It’s quite a good, light, fast game. So for me it was a no-brainer to pick up since I only had one of the models included (via an eBay secondhand thing) and their individual prices are, frankly, horrific (remember, I’m an Aussie – so take your local prices and make them even worse!)

What sucks is that in several regions (including my own), the game appears to not only be sold out, but hit with the dreaded dual “No Longer Available” and “Sold Out Online” stamp, which is a real shame, but speaks as to the way GW is pumping out these games with a very limited and defined shelf life. It also means we’re up a certain creek if we need to replace any components due to loss or damage. Bah. If the game sounds interesting, I’d get thee to a demo game or pick it up while you can. I’m sure there should be copies of it for cheap on eBay with the models stripped out, and as you can see, those are easy to proxy in – so as I said – a worthwhile fun, simple game to add to the collection for a varied session.

Age of Sigmar Starter Khorne Bloodreaver Hero

Anyway, the models are (too) sweet, and not having painted any Khorne in quite some time, I decided instead of getting right into them, I’d choose a few other models as proxies, that while still looking impressive, aren’t quite as expensive or involved as the official models. That way I’d have some things to play the game with while getting my Khorne Mojo going again – and then I can paint the proper models. In the meantime, this guy in WIP form, the Champion of Khorne, Champion of Nurgle, and Khorngor Champion (and a couple of others) have been getting some playtime in.

Age of Sigmar Starter Khorne Bloodreaver Hero

Colour scheme is pretty close to the “official” one, which in turn is pretty much Khorne-standard as established over the last 30 years. When I paint more of these guys and turn them into units for AoS/KoW/etc I’ll probably start to vary them more into something approaching different “uniform” schemes and effects (lacquered armour, etc) for every 8 or 16 of them. Without being too uniform of course, because chaos. I’ve added the little skull to the base not only as an aesthetic choice, but as a “front” marker. Miniatures (and GW’s ones in particular) often seem to have their bodies facing one direction while their heads face another – which is fine – but Gorechosen is a game where facing is a thing, so I’m using skulls to mark the “front” of the models that will be used in the game. The rest of the base is painted in keeping with the arena floor used in the game.

TL9 Talisman Adventure Ninja (Feb ’87)

Those of you who are regular readers may have noticed I’ve not been posting for a bit. The short version is that after several months of lining up a post every two days, I burnt out on blogging for awhile and needed a break. So anyway, I’ve still been painting, I’m back again, and I’ll attempt to get a post up at least once and ideally twice a week again. During my “time off” I haven’t really been following others’ blogs, either here on WordPress or over on Dakka, excepting the odd WP one that pops in my inbox. I’ll catch up, but I have been finding that just keeping up to date on other people’s work takes a good few hours each week, and when you’re tired anyway it can become quite draining. I’ll catch up guys, just give me some time. 🙂

Anyway, enough of my bitching and on to why people actually visit this page. Models!

Well, one model.

TL9 Talisman Adventure Ninja (Feb '97) Oldhammer

What we have here is the Ninja model from Talisman: Adventure, circa 1986. I picked this model up in the deep dark mists of time alongside several others that never got painted (or finished at least), including the TL9 Talisman Troll, who has also been showcased here a couple of years ago. Let’s face it, I probably got them all off Dave (who I still haven’t managed to track down!)

TL9 Talisman Adventure Ninja (Feb '97) Oldhammer

Nothing especially exciting about the paint scheme here. I’ve gone for black highlighted with blue instead of grey because that’s how blending in at night works, and painted his blade with a couple of dark metal tones from Vallejo. I’ve avoided the “highlight to white” look, because as awesome as it can be on other people’s figures, it’s generally not my own chosen look outside of hard armour edges on Marines, Eldar and such. There’s a sort-of zenithal thing going with more highlighting on his shoulders and hood than his lower half, but unfortunately for these photos, the satin varnish I chose to use on this model – which gives the model a really nice, subtle, look in hand – makes him look like he’s been swimming in gloss varnish in these photos, so these things are much harder to see here.

TL9 Talisman Adventure Ninja (Feb '97) Oldhammer

There’s not much else to add about this guy. He’s a Ninja model from an old edition of a game I’m not likely to spend much time with, because (despite owning almost all of the GW2e and most of the FFG stuff) Talisman is bloody tedious – and more a way to burn away an afternoon talking and such before deciding to pack it away unfinished than a good game, especially by today’s board game standards. With that in mind, it’s pretty much a figure that might be pulled out for the odd RPG or custom miniatures scenario, like that Scooby-Doo 7TV one I’ve had in my head for the past several years. Or… Imperial Assassin, anyone? Still, done is done!

Descent: Journeys in the Dark 1st Edition – Hellhounds

Descent 1.0 Hellhounds

Today’s models come from Descent: Journeys in the Dark 1st Edition. I picked it up secondhand several years ago, when I heard about how great a game it was, blurring the lines between RPG and miniatures boardgame. Shortly afterwards, the Second Edition came out, though I did pick up the official conversion kit, I’ve never gotten around to playing either of the things yet.

A month or so I got the idea to paint the Giant Spiders out of the 1e box. While I was poking around in there, I found these Hellhounds. Figuring that they’d paint up pretty quickly, I ended up putting the Spiders back and working on these instead. They didn’t take too long to get done, and being pretty rough figures I wan’t going to knock myself out over getting the absolute best paintjobs on them, either. Tabletop is good enough!

Descent 1.0 Hellhounds

Descent uses two different “types” of each monster: “White” ones, which are normal, or trooper-types and “Red” ones which are champion-level and tougher. So the sculpts come in two colours of plastic – Red and White (actually, more of a cream, but I digress). In order to be able to identify the two types, I painted the “White” ones with brighter orangey-red and red-to-yellow flame-fur, while the “Red” ones were painted in a slightly deeper, darker red and have yellow-to-black flame-fur. Enough to distinguish them when needed, but close enough that they still work in a pack for other games.

Descent 1.0 Hellhounds

Descent 1.0 Hellhounds

Speaking of other games, I knocked up a multi-base for them so that they can be used as a regiment in Kings of War. They’d be used as Proxy Hellhounds in my Khorne Chaos Daemons army, which in turn will be using the Forces of the Abyss/Hellhounds entry. Which I’ve just noticed while looking it up to write this only come in units of 5. And naturally, this base is made for a nominal unit of 10. Feck. That’s annoying, especially as they’re actual Hellhounds. Though the Mantic models also come on pissy little 25mm bases from Dungeon Saga, so perhaps the more appropriate proxy entry for these models will actually be a regiment of Abyssal Horsemen.

Assassinorum: Execution Force. Iron Warriors Chaos Space Marines

Assassinorum: Execution Force image copyright Games Workshop PLC.

Assassinorum: Execution Force. Image copyright GW

I purchased the Assassinorum: Execution Force boardgame (interestingly, listed as No Longer Available on the GWAU site) a few months ago – it might have been around Christmas. I purchased it not only for the miniatures (new plastic Assassins) but also fully intending to play it as a boardgame, since it got decent reviews, is co-op and apparently also works as a solo game. Naturally, I haven’t done a damn thing with it to date (hello, Deathwatch: Overkill!)

Recently, GW released the “Sector Imperialis” base range. With a somewhat reasonably-priced set of HIPs bases with a close-enough-to-spaceship texture now available readily and easily in 32mm, I picked up a set with a vague idea of rebasing my nascent Iron Warriors on them, as the resin ones I’d purchased years ago are all 25mm and now verboten for Space Marines. Actually, I think Marines (and a lot of other models) look better on the 32mm bases, so after an initial WTF reaction, I’m now well sold on the idea.

After picking up the bases, I put two and two together, and decided to use the Chaos Space Marines from Execution Force as my test subjects, as while they’re reasonable sculpts, they’re simple push-fit marines, and so perfect for proof of concept work. This what happened:

Assassinorum: Execution Force Chaos Space Marines, Iron Warriors.

Assassinorum: Execution Force Chaos Space Marines painted as Iron Warriors.

My biggest concern was that unlike, say, the Imperial Fist featured on the box art for the bases, the Iron Warriors in their, well, Iron/silver coloured armour with copper and brass accents with hazard stripes to break up the uniformity would not contrast enough with the bases, given that the bases are also painted in shades of silver iron, typically with the use of brass, copper and occasionally hazard stripes to break up the uniformity…. So, um…

Assassinorum: Execution Force Chaos Space Marines, Iron Warriors.

Warriors of the IV Legion proudly display the markings of their heritage.

I ended up giving the bases an additional watered-down black wash to try to define them more strongly from the marines. I’e used gunmetal on sections of the flooring, and the checkplate has a thin touch of blue to it that can be seen in person, if not in these photographs. I also used two of the new Gemstone paints for the first time – Soulstone Blue on the eye lenses, and Spiritstone Red on the bolter targeters. They turned out ok, I guess.

Assassinorum: Execution Force Chaos Space Marines, Iron Warriors.

And showing off the Forge World transfers. I quite like them. I’ll have to order another sheet.

Transfers are from the Forge World Iron Warriors decal sheet. Oh, and I sliced the “joined horns” off the guy on the righthand side. I don’t particularly like those (or these giant ribbed horns, truth be told) on my Chaos Space Marines. They don’t really fit my image of what I want for my Iron Warriors force. I see them much more as Renegade Marines than as Slaves to Chaos, so you probably won’t see another set of those giant horns anytime soon (smaller ones are okay, in limited use). I mostly wanted to avoid very similar chop-ups on 2 of the 3 models here, and being combination boardgaming models and proof of concept models for the proper force, just let them be.

As a bonus, these three count as my first entry for the Tale of Many Gamers Painting Challenge II that I’m once again running on Dakka. They’re not a legal 40k unit, but they are a “complete unit or group” for the Assassinorum: Execution Force boardgame.

I welcome any thoughts or feedback on the bases. Do they work for Iron Warriors despite the shared/similar palette? I’m not likely to add specific additions like blood spatter to them, and I’m not sure about weathering powders since I like the inferred “starship interior” look of them as well. I’m also considering using these for my Deathwatch: Overkill and even Space Hulk bases when I paint those sets of models, especially given the additional contrast from those models.

Small Fortune and a Little bit of Glory

So the last couple of weeks has been exceedingly unpleasant, with one of the least pleasant aspects of life making a sudden and unwelcome appearance. I stopped painting for a little while, but wanting to get back to normal, I’ve started again. The first figures I painted haven’t been varnished yet, so I’ll show them in a week or so. In the meantime, my group got together a few days ago and gave Fortune and Glory, an Indiana Jones-styled boardgame set in the late 1930’s a go. We just used the basic rules, since we were learning them.

Fortune and Glory Nazi Zeppelin

Nazi Zeppelin. Insert Hindenberg-related joke here.

The basic rules don’t actually use Villain characters – or more relevently to this post – the Nazi Zeppelin or the Aztec-styled pyramids. However, when we were packing up after midnight – after having the win stolen from me by Marouda, and then from her by Orez – I noticed that some of the little model-tokens would paint up exceedingly easily. So I made that a mini-project to knock over quickly.

Fortune and Glory Nazi Zeppelin

Reverse shot of the Zep. Now add your Page/Plant jokes.

The Zeppelin actually has those little swastikas sculpted into the tail fins. Not that I’m squeamish about that sort of thing, as I play historical games, do a bit of historical study and have a pretty clear understanding on who the “bad guys” were. One day I’ll actually get some Bolt Action Germans painted up as well. The Zep isn’t an amazing model – it’s very much a boardgame piece. I had a little bit of a play with the base and flying stem to give an impression of terrain and sky, but I’m not going to knock myself out turning out a piece of art. Likewise with the highlighting and shading on the Aztec temples.

Fortune and Glory Pyramids Temples Tombs

Mesoamerican/Aztec-style Pyramids.

The mesoamerican pyramids got painted in a sandstone-ish style. Not necessarily entirely accurate, though in some photos on Google Image Search they can indeed look like this – but mainly because a bit of colour looks better for game pieces.

Fortune and Glory Flying Frog Productions

A promotional still from Fortune and Glory – The Colourised Adventures.

And here is how they might look when being played. I’ve given them a solid coat of gloss varnish, followed up by matte. There’s a bunch of Nazi and Mobster models as well. I’ll probably paint the Nazis as brownshirts rather than as DAK, and the mobsters in simple black “mobster suits”. I imagine that both would be pretty simple to do, but I’ll get to them later. Probably.

 

Zombicide “Rick” and Angry Mary

A couple more Zombicide survivors today – the last two from the previous batch.

Rick” is a homage to Jason Statham as Chev Chelios from the 2009 Film “Crank 2: High Voltage“.

aka Jason Statham as Chev Chelios from Crank 2, Zombicide

Zombicide “Rick” and Zombivor version.

It seems that Statham’s outfit from Crank is a somewhat popular “costume” for people to wear. I guess it’s pretty flexible and a lot more subtle than going somewhere dressed as a Jedi. Turns out that in the second film, he had some fairly distinctive shoes because product placement. No matter to me, and as they have a look I can replicate on the model, so much the better

 

Angry Mary is an original Zombicide survivor, from the Karl Kopinski guest artist box.

Angry Mary – a Karl Kopinski Original Survivor for Zombicide

Mary is a popular character whenever one of us manages to draw her, and from our early games kind of defaulted to Marouda’s Zombpocalypse proxy, especially since Marouda managed to draw Angry Mary pretty regularly. So Mary has her combat boots painted as Marouda’s purple Doc Martens in a semi-subtle nod.

Zombicide Jason Statham as Chev Chelios from Crank 2, Angry Mary by Karl Kopinski

Orez and Marouda’s favourite survivors, ready for action.

Zombicide Jason Statham as Chev Chelios from Crank 2, Angry Mary by Karl Kopinski

…and the results of a couple of unfortunate Zombie Spawn draws.

Zombicide figures are odd ducks. They have some really well done, subtle truescale details like the folds in clothing while at the same time often having soft details on faces and weapons. It’s a limitation of the PVC that they are made from, and while they’re pretty much the best boardgame models I’ve used or painted, I still don’t entirely enjoy painting them in the same way that I do with a metal, HIPS or resin model. Still, they get a lot of use on my tabletop, so if anything deserves to keep a priority rating in my painting (such as it is), then these figures do.

Mary’s black fatigues and gloves are pretty dark, though they are highlighted subtly, and in a way to preserve them being black as opposed to grey. I’m just not fond of the whole “shade to white” thing that’s very popular on my own models. Statham’s dark blue jacket gave me the same kind of difficulty. For a change, the photography seems to have picked both out decently.

 

Space Crusade – Chaos Space Marines

Continuing the late 1980’s/early 1990’s thing I’ve had going for awhile here are a trio of Chaos Space Marines from the rather famous Space Crusade boardgame – part of the cooperation between Games Workshop and Milton Bradley from that era along with HeroQuest and Battle Masters. I had owned both HeroQuest and Advanced HeroQuest in the day, and managed to pick up replacement secondhand copies of both in the past few years to re-complete them. I also owned Battle Masters and Space Crusade, but sadly both of those got scattered to the winds over time through my own fault and poor choices, so there’s not that much left of either now.

Anyway, these three got painted back in the day and updated a month or two ago.

Space Crusade Chaos Space Marines of Nurgle, Khorne and Tzeentch

As noted in earlier posts, back in the 90’s I was’t able to afford all of the models I wanted (how some things never change, eh?) and so my solution was to paint what I had differently or uniquely to make up for it. Sadly, these are still the only World Eaters/Khornemarines and Thousand Sons/Tzeentchmarines I actually have painted to this day! I thought it’d be a good idea to give the Nurgle guy a cut-down “hoof” style foot, and then damage his horn. For some reason, I then thought it’s be a good idea to damage the Khorne guy’s horn in exactly the same place and way. /facepalm.

Space Crusade Chaos Space Marines of Nurgle, Khorne and Tzeentch

Space Crusade Chaos Marines show off their iconography.

The Nurgle guy got a visit from a red-hot paperclip from the stove and a bit of putty to create the disfigurement and damage to his armour. The iconography on the other two is freehanded, and was done 20-odd years ago with no need to touch it up recently. The main things I did to touch these guys up was to remove the green elements of armour from the Khorne and Tzeentch guys, as well as the removal of a bit of purple from Tzeentch-dude. As I’ve said, the early 90’s were a bit garish if you followed GW for inspiration too closely. They look much nicer now, muted down a little to their “proper” colours.

Space Crusade Chaos Space Marines of Nurgle, Khorne and Tzeentch

Rear View of the Space Crusade Chaos Marines

The Red-and-Green of the Nurgle Marine isn’t what I’d choose today, but was actually a common scheme for Nurgle Marines and Chaos Renegades from the Slaves to Darkness book, and was a bit part of the “original soul” of this painted guy, so I left it. I also rebased all three on the new 32mm round bases, which they fill out nicely and really fit with these models much better than the 25mm ones they lived on for so long.

This blog really has been filled with old models lately – it’s not intentionally retro, it’s just that a lot of what I’ve painted, am repainting and am finally finishing is from that era, and I’m trying to document everything I finish these days. I’m keen as hell to get onto some newer models and some Forge World and so forth, but I’m making myself hold off, with the exception of “work minis” that have simple techniques that I can do at work (and bore me to do at home!)