D&D Monster Manual 2: Iron Golem and Troll – aka 77168: Bones Battleguard Golem / 77004: Bones Cave Troll

A couple more painted Bones this time. One from the Kickstarter, the Battleguard (Iron) Golem, and another pre-KS model – the Troll.

When painting the “Iron” Golem (as he’s commonly known), I wanted to play with warm metallics (copper, bronze) and verdigris, so I happily disregarded the “Iron” portion of the model.

77168: Reaper Bones Battleguard Golem, Iron Golem

77168: Reaper Bones Battleguard Golem, Iron Golem

Much of the model was actually fun to work with. I utilised a lot of heavy drybrushing that worked well on the model to bring out all the slight imperfections of the cast, and helped to create a bit of a pitted, cast-metal look, which was perfect for my ends. The rear shot of the left forearm shows it pretty well. While I’m not especially happy with the way the sword blade turned out, being a cheap Bones model, I’m happy to call it good enough. The plastic of the blade was uneven and frankly an unpleasant pain to work with. The face was a bit of a mess. To sort of salvage it, I just painted it gold in the end, and gave it a hit of ink and a small highlight. The gems on the back of the shoulders and sword blade, and also the eyes were done using the usual GW-style gem technique and hit with gloss varnish. For what it’s worth, I think the glowing OSL effect on the Reaper website looks better, and if I’d seen it earlier I probably would have ripped it off, but c’est la vie.

77168: Reaper Bones Battleguard Golem, Iron Golem

77168: Reaper Bones Battleguard Golem, Iron Golem

The bags and chain on the back of his butt were a badly-cast mess, and so they got a very quick “good enough” job. The real highlight of the model to me was playing with some new mixes of paint washes along with the layered drybrushing to create the aged verdigris effect, which will no doubt make a reappearance later down the line on some venerable space marines of some description. I also did some dungeon furniture at the same time, which I’ll have to photograph down the line and show here as well. Base is my usual for this kind of thing – Proxie models 40mm round base with the plastic Bones base glued on top and a bit of acrylic putty to flatten it all out before sand and Army Painter tufts.

Anyway, as a low-stress learning experience and relatively fast model to paint, I consider this guy to be a success. Now he can sit on the shelf until Pathfinder calls him to duty!

77004: Bones Cave Troll

77004: Bones Cave Troll

This guy, like the Purple Worms from the last post, was a Bones figure I picked up before the Kickstarter campaign who spent most of the last year part-painted until I finally finished him properly more recently. The “learning experience” with this guy was to practice blending from unnatural skin tones (ie, the green) to more natural ones (the flesh). I saw some fine work done in this manner on Citadel Dragon Ogres many years ago, and it’s also been used to some extent on the LotR trolls – which is one of the places this guy can do duty, along with Pathfinder and wargames like Warhammer and Kings of War.

77004: Bones Cave Troll

77004: Bones Cave Troll

77004: Bones Cave Troll

The paint was originally a bit nicer, but it got severely messed up (in my opinion) when I hit the finished model with Army Painter’s spray (matt!) varnish. The model got a nasty shine, some sandy “frosting” on his limbs, and it also attracted a bunch of tiny little hairs. I’ve gone over it with paint-on Vallejo, but it’s still not quite right. The base used the same techniques as listed above for the golem, but not as successful, and being a cheap bones model I’d prefer to buy another one and do it again then spend the time to rework the whole base – ie “good enough”. His claws are badly defined, and the facial details are a bit soft and sloppy – picking out the eyes was not easy. Blending the pustulent and infected looking boils into his skin was fun as always, but despite my misgivings about the casting of the figure overall and especially some specific parts of the model (claws, face) – and even the messed up finish thanks to the Spray and my sub-par job on the base, I find it to be another successful practice model. Good enough for Roleplaying and certainly tabletop quality for wargaming.

D&D Monster Manual 1: Purple Worms – aka Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

There’s a bit of discussion about at the moment, regarding how Bones is not a great material for certain figures, and can be a bit of an unpleasant material to work with for some people. While I’d agree that it’s far from perfect, it works out really well for certain figures. I bought this pair of Pre-KS Bones over a year ago, but they got put to one side for most of that time when I had to pack up to move, then move, and unpack and so forth. Recently I finished them, and finally we had some decent light, so today they got photographed. There’s a bit of mould line that I missed on one of them. Noticed it when it was too late, and I didn’t want to butcher my paint in order to fix it. You barely notice in person, anyway. Mostly pictures in this update, so without further ado… The Pair:

Purple Worms, Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

Purple Worms, Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

Purple Worms, Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

Drippy: I used some Woodland Scenics Water Effects to create the beginning of the “drool”, some WC Realistic Water over the top to smooth it out, and some Vallejo Model Colour Clear Yellow to add a touch of colour to the discharge.

Purple Worm, Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

Purple Worm, Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

Purple Worm, Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

Purple Worm, Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

Bitey: One with mucus/drool/mouthy discharge was enough.

Purple Worm, Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

Purple Worm, Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

Purple Worm, Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

Finally a scale shot. A couple of fantasy figures, and a ubiquitous Space Marine for scale. These are some decent sized models!

Purple Worms, Reaper Bones 77006: Great Worm

These suckers took awhile to get going, but once I actually sat down to make myself paint them they were quite an enjoyable experience. Originally they were all-purple, then I looked up the D&D colouration, which said they had yellow bellies/undersides, which I thought would look far too cartoony, but it kept bothering me. A day or two later I came back to them and used some sand and ochre shared for the “yellow” to make them look much more like natural colouration, and it worked for me. I used some pinky-purple for the transition ridge between the ochre and the main dark bluish-purple for the main body. One of the things I enjoyed most was the fact that since these are cheap Bones models, I allowed myself to play with them a lot more. I used drybrushing, blending, a purple oil paint wash at one stage, the aforementioned realistic water products, and a few weathering powders in the end. Basically a lot of experimentation and “play”, and I think they turned out pretty successful in the end!

Hail, Theoden King!

This figure was painted late last year, for another charity auction at work. Much the same as the original Savage Orc from the first few posts, in fact. This time, instead of forgetting to take a few nice photos of the finished product, I forgot to take WIP pictures until almost the end of the process, so there was little point in showing them here.

For this charity figure, I chose Theoden on foot from the Citadel Lord of the Rings range. I chose Theoden for a couple of reasons – those being that he’s a very nice model, has a nice pose, is a somewhat recognisable character, and because I’d ended up with a spare of the figure (which always helps!) This figure is of course, a metal version, and from before they bundled it together with a non-matching sculpt.

When I started preparing the figure, I found that the truescale nature of it was just going to be far too small for an item in a charity auction. A 25mm round base is fine for gaming, but not quite as exciting for a model purely destined for display. As I don’t have any of those huge and imposing Scibor bases, and didn’t want the base to overwhelm the tiny figure anyway, I went for something a bit larger than the figure, but not big enough to distract.

I chose a 40mm “slate” base from Back-to-Base-IX and added some static grass clumps and flowers from Army Painter’s range. I know my mate Cash loves the clumps, referring to them as “sea urchins” and while I can somewhat see where he’s coming from, I like them for larger bases as they give a bit more depth than regular static grass (or indeed, a Reaper “broccoli” base).

I only found these photos on my camera yesterday. I’d actually thought they were already up here on the Blog, but when I did a search for “Theoden”, nada turned up. I suppose I painted the figure around the time I was getting prepared and packed up to move, so after getting the model done it was back to work and packing and such at the time.

Anyway, done now and months ago sold and given to it’s new owner. Painting the figure was quite the enjoyable process, made moreso by the fact that it only took a few days from start to finish and that the money was going to a good cause. I hadn’t painted a truescale model for some time, either, and the detail on Theoden was surprisingly fine after being to used to predominantly working on the much broader detailed Heroic Scaled figures for so long.

From the Painting Desk #2 – Random Warhammer Fantasy stuff.

The last few posts have mostly been a series of reviews of Kromlech and Maxmini’s resin conversion components, which has been fun (I’ve still got a few more of those posts to make, not to mention some reviews of Scibor, Puppetswar and Bitspudlo to put together, but those reviews take a bit more energy than I have at the moment. I’ve been under the weather for almost three weeks now as Winter has hit Melbourne, and have been keeping up with my work commitments, so blogging has taken a back seat for the past few. I’ve been painting a bit when I feel up to it and just enjoying the process. I put together one of these WIP posts some time ago – Back in March 2010, so this is the (somewhat) sequel. Though there’s also been a few other half-arsed WIP posts made as well. Unfortunately, not much has been done on those LotR figures in the last one of these posts since the post was made. Having moved twice since then, the figures are safely boxed away until I find them and decide to get back and finish them.

The main things I’ve been completing are boardgame figures from the D&D series of Ravenloft and Ashardalon. I’ve got Drizzt but won’t be opening it until:

a) All the figures from the previous 2 are completed

or

b) We finish the campaign in Ashadalon (as we’ve finished Ravenloft)

I just finished a triad of ghouls from Ravenloft that I must have started a full year ago. Since I don’t like the models, I found it to be quite a hard slog. I’ve also been working on some semi-random figures, which we can/do use as PCs in the boardgame, and just generally looking through my old models to try and “finish” some of those half-painted figures that have been sitting around for a long time – in some cases quite a few years or even more than a decade. While in theory I’m a miniatures wargamer, I haven’t played with any regular consistency for close to ten years, so whenever I try to start working on or completing an army, it’s been easier than ever to get distracted. Now that we’re in our own place, it’s going to be easier to get back into it, though even with a FLGS nearby that runs events regularly, I find myself pretty deep in a rut that prefers to come home to a warm, heated/airconditioned house with drinks, TV, snacks and all the other amenities than to go and hang out in a crowded games store for the evening. So once again, army building has been pushed to the side, and I’m now going for painting for pleasure with only a side order of “duty to get specific things finished” – in this case, the D&D figures – and it’s been enjoyable to actually finish some models.

I’ve also been trying to play around with some new techniques. Specifically: weathering powders, oil paint washes, verdigris effects, and things like MIG washes for various rust effects. I still haven’t tried NMM. I can appreciate how good it can look, but there’s still just something about it that doesn’t sit well with me, and I prefer to use actual metallic paints. I’ll get around to learning it at some stage, as after all, it’s just another technique for the painter’s toolkit.

So, some photos. I’ve been keeping the D&D figures out of photos since I started them – until I complete the set for each game I won’t be showing them off. This is because the figures are nice, but not quite “wargamer” standard being made of that bendy plastic, and so my paint has been more concerned with getting a tabletop quality that I’m happy with for boardgaming – which is below what I’ll generally do for a nice metal model from Citadel or Reaper, etc.

Oldhammer model Farendil, Elf Ranger and Lucrezzia Belladonna, both WIP but nearing completion.

The foot figure is an old Citadel ranger, which I picked up around the time of WHFB3, twenty-odd years ago. I started painting him only last year, in a scheme that is somewhat a homage to the paint he had in a very old issue of White Dwarf. The red bow is a nod to GW’s “red period”, though I may yet decide to go over it with a more neutral brown before I complete it. He’s probably only got an hour or so worth of work left on him now, but I feel that I need to be over this cold in order to put in the last bit of work at a standard I’ll be satisfied with. The Brettonian lady must be at least 5 years old? Certainly the majority of the paint on her was done in that time period. When I found her, I again noted that she probably only has an hour or less of work to be completed. I considered doing some freehand on the horse’s caparison, but my wife (who the figure is for) likes the figure as it is, and for my part, I’m not entirely sure which green I used on it…  again though – I need to get over this damned colds before I can do so.

(2017 Update – It’s Lucrezzia Belladonna from WHFB 5th Edition’s Dogs of War alongside Fandendil, Elf Ranger – both finally completed in 2014 .)

Citadel Dwarf Rune Priest and Reaper Miniatures 03278: Rogan, Half-Orc Thief

These two figures were started essentially as proxies for the bendy plastic D&D hero figures that didn’t inspire me at all to get painted. The D&D Dwarf was okay, but not great, and the Half-orc was arse. Both of these were started last year before I moved, and have just come out of the case to be finished. The Dwarf is either a GW Runesmith or Standard bearer, but I figure that he’ll work nicely as a cleric – armed with a (rather large) Warhammer and an (even larger) Dwarven Holy Symbol. The half-orc thief is from Reaper, and didn’t fit onto a 25mm round base, and his stance was wide enough that he’d end up overlapping one too much if I cut the broccoli base off, so he ended up on a Proxie Models 40mm round base. Apparently D&D Half-orcs are supposed to have grey or greenish-grey skin these days, but I’m going a ruddy human tone with a touch of orange instead. Like the old Blanche hobgoblin face icon. I’ve been painting my D&D orcs with a dark brown, Weta-version Uruk-Hai skin tone anyway rather than the GW green I paint my Citadel orcs. The dwarf is pretty close to that “final hour” stage, while the Half-Orc needs a bit more work to get there.

(2017 Update – This pair is Citadel Colin Dixon’s Dwarf Rune Priest alongside Reaper Rogan, Half-Orc Thief – finally finished in 2017 and 2015 respectively.)

Jes Goodwin’s Oldhammer Elf Wardancers

After rebasing a couple of my old, old WHFB3 dwarves about a year ago (ones that survived my Dwarf Army cull, back in the days of my youth) to boardgame with, I’ve decided this week to go through many more of my old models from decades past and update them. I don’t mean strip them entirely (I made that mistake with some very well painted for the day Rogue Trader marines last year, and regret it badly). I mean rebase them on 25mm rounds since I’m pretty much at the point that I recognise and admit to myself that I’ll never play WHFB again. I’ve always strongly preferred the aesthetic of round bases, they’re still just fine for skirmish games like Mordheim, Song of Blades and Heroes, LotR, Fanticide, Realm of Chaos’s warbands and if I decide to use them in another Fantasy mass battle game like Kings of War (somewhat likely) then I’ll simply mount them in/on regiment bases, WotR -style. I’ll also take the opportunity to touch up paint chips, brighten sword blades, perhaps reblend some cloth highlights and pretty up gems, but the essence of my original paintjobs will remain the same. The linked dwarves for example, had bright yellow shield rims changed to metallic bronze, their warhammer heads brightened up and bright yellow belts changed to a yellowish tan. The rest is original 1980’s/early 90’s paint. Like the Dwarves, the Original Wardancer models from the Wood Elves’ range are some of the few of these old models that survived successive culls through the years. I always had a soft spot for the Wardancers that GW painted up like Eldar Harlequins (though they predate the Harlies!) Maybe I’ll mix these fantasy figures in with my 40k Harlequins when I get around to playing them?

(2017 Update – it seems I finished updating these five, but never photographed them once I had. Something to add to my list for a new post, then!)

Assorted Oldhammer Fantasy Models

A few more figures getting the rebasing/updating treatment. The wardancer will pretty much be left alone. The dwarf will get a bit of a touch up (even though there’s something about him I don’t really like). I’ll probably brighten up the knights’ armour, add another layer of highlights to the plume, repaint the horns, and I also need to figure out what to do with their shields – since I’m unhappy with both. Either repainting the devices (Bat, Snake) or something more drastic. Basically, I’ve never truly been happy with either of these figures, so I need to do something to fix them this time. The skeleton.. well, yeah. Clearly he needs a complete clothing overhaul.

The bases for the models in both of these pics are obviously WIP as well. The sand is still drying as I type this.

(2017 Update – I think most of these figures ended up in the reject pile, to be repainted from scratch at worst and touched up at best. I think only the Wardancer survived.)

Squigs!

A shot of some squigs I found earlier today. These guys will be getting round-base updates for 40k Orks. The scaled squig looks good in person, but due to his downward pose photographs badly. I’ll have to see what I can do for him when I rebase him – so his face can be more visible. I’m still very happy with the paint on my Scarlet Squigs, and the yellow one is a paint-over of a figure I bought from a friend in the late 1990’s, that also turned out nicely. With the exception of the greenie, these ones just need rebasing.

More Squigs!

More squigs. Obviously I bought a blister of the newer models sometime around 2004-5. Nothing had been done on these models since my Ork army got shelved in late 2005. The Yellow one was simply painted a pale yellow, but when I found these about three days ago, I was just staring at the models on my painting table, basically wishing I could finish the ranger from the first photo and so I started playing with yellows and oranges. I’m thinking I might try some orange-yellow oil washes on him as well, to experiment a little more with the technique.

(2017 Update – I finally finished most (all?) of these squigs and based them on brown-dirt 25mm rounds – but apparently never photographed them. Now that I’m resurrecting my 40k armies, I need to decide whether to rebase them again onto desert bases like my 40k Orks, and potentially even 32mm bases. Of course my WHFB (KoW) Squig Herders have brown-dirt bases. I might need to come up with some kind of creative solution there…)

 

The Painting Desk.

My temporary painting desk, a folding table in the lounge/dining room. Until I get the garage sorted out properly, I won’t be able to get the “studio” sorted out properly, so this is my temporary location. It’s not too bad actually. It’s a bit of a pain to pack up, but it’s doable. I’ve got heat and television and Marouda doesn’t have a problem with it, so it’s all good for now. There’s a pegasus and unicorn of hers there who are also getting their bases upgraded (though theirs will be bright green static flock rather than brown sandy dirt). A techmarine, Reaper Vampire, lizardman and bones troll and a bunch of my WIP D&D figures. You can also see my philosophy when it comes to paint brands is simply to use whatever works best for me at the time for the project.

I hope to have some nice shots of finished models sometime soon. I usually like to use natural light for those, but the days have been short and dark for some time now, and I’m at work for a good amount of the daytimes as well. Hopefully you enjoyed reading this and poking around my paint desk!

(2017 Update – God damn that desk looks clean and uncluttered. It’s a right mess these days in comparison to back then…)

MaxMini Head sizes – Polish Resin Extra!

After some requests for size comparisons on the MaxMini from Dakka and in the comments, I’ve taken some quick photos to help people judge which heads are right and wrong for their own purposes. I’ve also got an older review – of the Steam Knight helmets. Though I only used Marine bodies on that one, as you can see in that post, they’re on the smaller side, and so I think they’d work on smaller like the below Mantic/McVey models as well.

MaxMini heads and various figures.

From left-right, we have a Sedition Wars female, a “marine” made of a Maxmini head, GW torso and Anvil Industries legs.  A sci-fi Bombshell Babe. She’s about the height of a marine, but less bulky – A good representative for many of Reaper’s sci-fi figures. Next is A Mantic Enforcer, Mantic Corporation with actual head, Sedition Wars male, and another Mantic Corporation fig with Maxmini “Biohazard” diving bell. Last up, we have a completed GW Space Marine.

MaxMini heads.

So. Opinion time. The gladiator helmets are a little small for marines, but workable. They’re also suitable for the McVay and Mantic figures, as actual gladiator helmets are pretty damned big.

The Black Lotus helmets are perfect for marines, but a bit big for the truescale figures – unless you want big ancients helmets for them.

The “Immortals” Egyptian helmets would work on the McVey/Mantic bodies. They might seem a touch big, but then there’s a lot of bling on them, so if you disregard all of the spikes and so forth which make them look bigger, they work. Similarly, they work on marines, but may look a touch smallish.

MaxMini heads.

The Mecha-Egyptian helmets (V.1) look perfect for marines, but a bit big to go with the truescale figures. Similarly, the Biohazard heads are perfect for marines but too big for the truescales. A possible exception for the “diving bell” helmet, since diving bells IRL are huge, so with a trim to the neck they could work with truescale figure – depending on what you’re trying to do.

The Hybrid heads are a good fit for truescale figures – bear in mind that they are deliberately bulbous, though. They seem a little small for marines.

Once again, I hope this is helpful. I realise it might be a touch mroe useful if I clipped off a bunch of the heads and blu-tacked them to a Mantic and GW torso, but I don’t want to cut up the sprues at this stage, since it makes the heads easier to lose. (yeah, after moving house, I need to find those Steam Knight helmets I linked earlier..!)

Polish Resin #6: MaxMini Gladiator, Alien Hybrid, Biohazard, Black Lotus Heads

So it’s the next set of pictures and commentary of the recent order I received from Maxmini. In my last post I looked at the two types of Mecha Egyptian heads that they offer. This time it’s a bit more varied. Once again, all images are clickable for bigger versions.

MaxMini Gladiator Helmets.

First up are the Gladiator helmets. I bought these without any incredibly firm use for them, simply because they looked so nice. I’ve been considering using them as heads for Pre-Heresy-styled World Eater Gladiators. Maybe Khornate ones that still have their old Relic-aged helmets – or I’ve just realised as I’ve been typing this that they would be perfect for my Iron Warriors berserkers that I’ve been intending to build for the last 5 years – I’ve just been needing a way to make them unique, but distinctly both berserkers and Iron Warriors without using the “bunny ears”. Now I’ll have to buy a few more… hmm…

MaxMini Alien Hybrid Heads

Next up are the Alien Hybrid heads. Again, I bought these without any immediate purpose. I’ve got a bunch of old-school Genestealers and Hybrids that I need to get around to sometime, but they’re not a priority in my paint queue for the time being. As you can see, they’re finely detailed, though they’re quite small – more truescale than heroic. Having said that, I’m sure they’d work well on top of a guardsman’s body. Something I’m happy to have in my bits box for the moment when I’m building something and decide I’ll need them.

MaxMini Biohazard Heads

MaxMini Biohazard helmets. Unlike the others, I knew exactly what I wanted to do with these from the moment I saw them. These will be going onto the heads of Plague Marines and Death Guard. When I got these, I opted out of the one sculpt that didn’t appeal to me (in execution, not concept) by asking the MaxMini guys for a custom mix. Since they’re able to do that without a hassle from a lot of the items in their range, it was no problem, and I picked up an extra pair of the “diving bell” sculpt, which I really like. I’ll probably pick up some more of these down the line as well, as the Diving Bell also has a lot of potential outside of the specific CSM use I plan for most of them.

MaxMini Tribe of Black Lotus Helmets

Finally, for this post at least is the Tribe of Black Lotus Helmets. A bit of a long, unwieldy name, yes, but some great sculpts. In the past I’d considered these but passed, as I didn’t have a specific use for them, but now I’ve pretty much got two solid options for them, and will probably go with both. These will be used in a mixture of a Greek-themed Space Marine force (no, not Minotaurs, though I’ll certainly use some of their Forge World parts) and also steal a few of them to use on Various Slaanesh Champion and Emperor’s Children figures. (2017 Edit – Erm, yeah, I am actually doing Minotaurs now, using these on the odd commander-type model!)

Maxmini Tribe of Black Lotus Helmets

As you can see, these parts are pretty much flash-free, with just a small bit of cleanup required on an occasional piece. Clean bubble-free casts, and quality (non-itchy!) resin.

There’s a few other nice-looking head/helmet styles on offer from MaxMini as well that I’ll be purchasing in the future to check out. The Space Police, Steam Knight Noble and Zombie heads are all ones that look good and I’ll likely be purchasing and reviewing in the future, so look out for those (in a couple of months.)

The next post will be MaxMini stuff, as I’ve got some jump packs and other odds and ends to review. After that, I’ve got a bunch of stuff I’ve bought from Kromlech, Scibor and Puppetswar to photograph and review, so the Polish Resin series will have a fair few more installments to come!

As always, I hope people find these shots useful!

Kromlech: Orc Juggernaut Mecha-Armour Squad – Polish Resin #4

A few weeks ago I saw some previews of some new items from Kromlech, a polish outfit who do resin conversion parts that happen to fit popular heroic 32mm Orcs and Armoured Space Warriors. I’ve gotten stuff from them on occaision, but when I saw these, I knew I had to order them right away, as I knew they would fit outstandingly into my Ork army. No pics of the painted elements of that army unfortunately, as they got attacked by a dragon from the warp a couple of years ago (or possibly a cat) and there was critical falling damage and then some foot-crushing damage when I next entered that particular room. Then I had to move. Twice. So they’re still “in the shop” until I get properly set up here.

Anyway, when I saw these, I had to own them. So I made that happen. By sending them money.

The casts, as you can see are absolutely brilliant. No flash. No bubbles. Every bit of detail is crisp and visible. The resin is not the type that makes you itchy. They’re literally a pleasure to look at and handle. I haven’t been this impressed by a new figure in quite some time. Why? The details and the casting. You can really tell the thought and care that went into these models by looking at all of the little things.  The scavenged weapons bolted onto the arms are filled with detail, right down to the wires and tiny hydraulics that are jury-rigged up to pull their triggers.

The set also comes with 5 heads so you’ve got a fair bit of choice for the three, or if you purchase more for a bigger unit, it’s that much easier to individualise them. I also got a set of their Orc Gas Mask heads that I may or may not use on these – or perhaps on some infantry.

They’re also huge. Stacking up as bigger than Ghazkull in mega-armour and pretty solidly to Killer Kans. Regular Mega-Armoured Nobs won’t stand a chance. So they’re also completely suitable for use as a Warboss. I also included a Terminator and a power-armoured marine, who both just look weedy in comparison.

Enough talk. Time for the pictures – they’re all clickable for larger versions:

Orky Size Comparison. Note the Kromlech Base is slightly shorter than the GW ones.

Size – Compared to Marines.

Overall Size Comparisons

Armoured heads on top. Gas Mask heads below (purchased seperately).

Torso Left

Torso Front.

Torso Right

Legs Front.

Legs Rear.

Right Arm Outer.

Right Arm Inner.

Left Arm Outer.

Left Arm Innner.

So basically, I was impressed by how they looked online, and having them in hand, I’m even more impressed, and a little surprised at how good they are (a lot of the little details just aren’t visible in the preview photos I saw) and how well they’re cast. I should point out that I’ve got no affiliation with Kromlech and I bought these for full price from their eBay store.

If you’re interested in checking out more by Kromlech, look up the Kromlech.EU Facebook Page or these figures can be bought directly from the Kromlech eBay Store.

Basically, if you play Orks in Warhammer 40k, are looking for an impressive and imposing model for your games of Deathwatch or Rogue Trader RPG, or just want a big cool model to paint up, I can easily give these my highest recommendation.