Citadel Grave Guard – As Kings of War Wights (Neglected Model May ’18)

Citadel Grave Guard 6th Edition Vampire Counts

A (little) bit of a break from WarZone models today, however briefly (I have another two close to finished, so hopefully can get them done and posted over the next two days.)

A couple of years ago, around about September 2014 – I bought a whole bunch of Undead off Nerdfest over on Dakka. Amongst those were a bunch of Spirit Hosts which I rebased individually got got up and done within a day of receiving them. These models… not so much.

Blister photo via eBay.

Part of the Vampire Counts range from the early 2000’s, 2004-05 being the earliest reference I can easily find, they seem to have come in very specific blisters, since I keep finding the same trio when I was looking to find out more details about these models. That makes them models from the 6th Edition, so they could easily date back from as far as 2001, which was when the 6th Edition Warhammer Armies: Vampire Counts book was released.

Citadel Grave Guard 6th Edition Vampire Counts

Anyway, when I got them I thought they were decent models that could be pretty simply painted up. I suggested to Marouda that they’d be good models for her to paint up. She never showed much interest, so I got started on them myself. Of course, I didn’t exactly get them done quickly. I felt that as a trio of models that are quite different to everything else I have in sculpt style, and a re a bit bigger than the norm, I thought they could work well enough as a unit of three Wights in Kings of War. With that in mind, I mounted them on 32mm bases as opposed to the 25mm bases they came with. Wights are (now) on 40mm bases, but I’ll just build them a unit tray-base for KoW with the correct 40x120mm footprint.

Later.

Lord of the Rings Barrow-Wights. Yeah, that “OSL” is incredibly rough, but it was my first ever attempt.

Similarly, their paint scheme was informed by the scheme I used on the other unit of Wights, which is made up of two Lord of the Rings Barrow-Wights and a single Army of the Dead plastic model in the same paint scheme. Spectral blue-green robes (yes, these are more blue-blue-green than the previous set), metal weaponry and armour, and the creature inside looking roughly how they might look that far into their death.

Citadel Grave Guard 6th Edition Vampire Counts

So here, I’ve followed that with the robes, but the leather coifs and cuirass straps looked a bit silly in spectral blue-green, so instead I went with dark grey instead, over other choices like leather browns. Being in that awkward space between the metal armour and the spectral cloth, dark grey-black was good enough to fit in without drawing too much attention to it.

Citadel Grave Guard 6th Edition Vampire Counts

Shields came from a mid-point range of GW’s Chaos Warriors. Following the old-school, Realm of Chaos models with their open-hole shields but before the range went all-plastic. Given the skull-tastic designs on all three, I nicked them out of my shields tub for these undead fellows instead.

Realm of Chaos – Nurgle’s Children 2018 #13: Malifaux Killjoy (Metal Version) as Herald of Nurgle

OK, no pretence here – I picked this model up a few years ago both because it looked like a cool model, and like something that would drop perfectly nicely in with my Nurgle forces. I know that Malifaux is supposed to be a rather excellent skirmish game, but I’ve already got a ton of games I’m not actively playing, so I’m not about to dive down that particular rabbit hole right now.

I figure that this guy fits perfectly well in a Daemonic Nurgle force for either 40k or AoS as a Herald. I’m pretty happy with how well this model turned out. It’s a great sculpt, and I guess that’s the thing that really inspires taking it that bit further. Could I have converted him slightly by sticking a monohorn on top of his head. Sure. Does he need it? I don’t think he does. He’s more of a small Great Unclean One than a large Plague Bearer.

Beyond the use as a Herald in the Warhammer games, he also fits well into the Kings of War Undead army as a Flesh Golem or some such using the Undead Troll stats, or could optionally drop into a Renegades and Heretics 40k force alongside the Bones Flesh Golem as a Renegade Marauder Brute. Along with that, there’s obviously the D&D-ish role-playing options along with potential use as a Zombicide Abomination. Quite a cool model with a lot of versatility.

Cheeseburger the Bear (Reaper Bones 77494: Dire Bear)

Here’s a model that I randomly found in a baggie of Reaper Bones models from one of their Kickstarters. I believe I pulled it out at the same time I found the Carrion Worms, so it’s been sitting around for a couple of months now, having a little bit done to it every so often.

The fur had actually been done for some time, and the model just kept getting shoved out of the way from one spot on the desk to another, until I was doing the basing on another trio of models last weekend, so I grabbed the bear to do it’s base at the same time.

So a couple of days ago I saw it there, and decided to finish it off. A couple of hours later and the fur was finished, claws and muzzle and mouth and eyes painted, matt painted on and some tufts added. Anyone who has played Far Cry 5 will understand why I’ve called this bear Cheeseburger (though it also makes me think of the ROH/NJPW Wrestler).

I’m pretty happy with how Cheeseburger’s face turned out. It’s the first time I’ve painted a realistic Black Bear’s face (albeit on a simple Bones model), and it was quite a bit of fun.

In gaming terms, it’s a pretty flexible model. Obviously there’s a place for it in Roleplaying Games, but also anything scenario based, such as Historicals, Fantasy, even some sci-fi. There’s also potential for use in any army (again, especially Fantasy and Historical) that has animal or beast handlers – even 40k could work here – Dark Eldar/Drukhari Clawed Fiend, anyone?

I’ve only just considered that I could have made an awful pun and titled this post “Bear-ly Legal”, but on second thought while puns like Who Let the Dogs Out, etc are fin and fun, Bear-ly Legal might attract the wrong kind of crowd via searches. 😉

It does remind me of an amusing and wholly-unrelated anecdote that I’ll share here. Back in the mid-90’s when I used to play The Warhams with a regular and fluid group in a store in Melbourne’s CBD, there were a couple of other younger, 20’s guys who were also into wrestling, as I was. One evening we were talking about one particular guy lending me a pair of videotapes that he’d gotten hold of. One called Hardcore Heaven and the other called Barely Legal. We were discussing how good they were supposed to be (I’d heard of them, but not ever seen them). Another guy who overheard the discussion warned us that we needed to “be careful” with stuff like that. After a minute or so, we explained to him that we were talking about a different Hardcore Heaven and Barely Legal than what he thought we were on about. We were of course talking about Extreme Championship Wrestling’s first two PPV events. You’re welcome.

Oh, and here’s a size shot of the Big Guy. Pretty happy with how this one turned out, especially given that it’s a Bones model with soft detail and weird, difficult mould lines. The good news at least is that while both of those do stand out a bit in these oversized photos, they’re not really an issue for the model in hand.

Who Let The Do- Oh, wait. I’ve used that joke twice now. Here are some Wolves. (#Squaduary 2018)

So here we have a bunch of wolves that have been sitting around since roughly forever, that Squaduary finally motivated me to git’r’done. (That’s a word, right?) I’m not going to try to claim this one as a Fembruary post, though.

These wolves come from at least three manufacturers, and possibly up to four or five. Like a dumbass, I didn’t take proper note of what was stamped in their bases before gluing them down to the Warlord Games pill bases. I think some are either Ral Partha or RAFM. Or perhaps both? And possibly some of them once belonged to a non-citadel goblin chariot of some description.

They’re painted quite simply, and unlike on Conan’s wolves, I didn’t go all-out on trying to make their fur layers stand out, or mixing in of brown into the greys, or a lot of facial markings.

There are definitely at least a couple of different sculptors’ work here, even before we get the the final two (more interesting) wolves. I seem to have forgotten to photograph one of them in a glamour shot. Ah well. It’s still in the group shot.

These two are the ones with a bit more story. The finely detailed wolf is a Mithril Miniatures Warg that I purchased back in the early 1990’s. I wanted to use this more impressive wolf for a goblin hero riding a wolf. From back when Warhammer heroes and warlords and generals rode pretty much the same beasts as their troops did. Clearly, that particular kitbash model never got completed.

The rough-as-guts wolf with the cartoony snout is one of the few remaining models that I still have from my brother’s collection. It’s a Warg from Minifigs’s Lord of the Rings line. It’s a Large Wolf from Minifigs Mythical Earth line. So this figure dates back from 1977.

Finally, a size comparison shot, so these wolves can be seen alongside a Conan Wolf, a Space Wolf Wolf, and a Space Marine. These wolves will mix pretty easily into any game that needs wolves really. From fantasy to historicals to role-playing. Maybe even Space Wolves something something. I’ll probably make them a MDF unit base or two for Kings of War, though I haven’t played that game in an age now.

Citadel F3 Barbarians (Alan & Michael Perry, 1987)

Ok, so only our friend here with the double-bladed axe “Gerloc” actually appears in the 1987 Citadel Journal under the F3 banner, but the other two models are both variants on “Gudrud”, who is on that same page, so I’m comfortable with placing these in the same vintage.  A further variant appears in the 1988 “Blue” catalogue under the Barbarian range, along with a Valkyrie-styled figure who I kept in a baggie alongside the boys here for many years. She’ll be painted alongside the Shieldmaidens and Valkyries from Foundry.

This first figure clearly draws heavy inspiration from Frank Frazetta and Boris Vallejo’s Conan artwork, as do so many barbarians from so many ranges.

This figure was a real motivator for me to learn new techniques for painting black hair, which (let’s face it) can be a right pain in the arse, since we don’t want it to look blue, or grey, or dark brown. Hopefully I’ve managed to pull it off (thanks, Duncan!) and if I haven’t – blame Duncan!

Gerloc here is pretty much also Conan. The spike from his helm was lost long ago, but at least I managed to keep the rest of him intact enough over the years.

I painted these three together, and tried for a slightly more tanned look to their skin than my usual Caucasian skin without appearing too ruddy or too orange. Not that you can really tell here with no models to compare the trio to.

Also on these three, I avoided painting on any tattoos, as I’d be temped to with any models that have a lot of muscular skin showing. Given that they’re old-school models that are a representation of a particular style of artwork (Frazetta, Vallejo) I left their bare skin bare of ink.

This third figure is actually not Conan! He looks and feels to me like a barbarian warlord. The stance, topknot of hair, helm under his arm and especially his cape really work together to suggest a veteran of many battles who now leads a party of warriors to battle.

Of course, his stature being that of a figure circa the late 1980’s means that he looks like a peon when stood next to a newer Barbarian from pretty much any company – let alone something like a Khorne Bloodbound (his spiritual successors), so he may well be relegated to veteran warrior or even a regular warrior/cannon fodder when/if he’s used in any games.

I was painting a similar Chronpia model alongside these guys, but he got bumped at the 11th hour so I could concentrate on this trio of truly old-school models. He’ll be done soon, and the four shall again be united!

Finally – a note and shout-out to those people whose Blogger/Blogspot blogs that I follow – especially Curis and The Responsible One. For whatever reason, either my computer, or my browser, or something is screwy and so when trying to leave a comment in Blogspot blogs using my WordPress account often (almost always) throws me into some weird loop of selecting my username and “publishing” my comment, but then it goes back to selecting my username, and then round and round we go. So I might not be commenting much – but I’m still out here watching and reading! And if you’re unfamiliar with their blogs, you should definitely check them out!

Hell Dorado Ashoka – Sizing!

Hell Dorado Ashoka

I’ve been asked a few times in different places just how big the Ashoka model actually is. Because apparently my memory is getting worse, I keep forgetting about that, and then forgetting to photograph it alongside some other models. So I finally remembered – here he/she (I’m not looking to check!) is alongside a standard Space Marine on 32mm base, and a Khorne Bloodbound model, also on a 32mm base. Ashoka is on a 50mm “rolled edge” WMH-style base, and also raised up a little on a platform of stone (cork).

3-D Printer? One on the horizon? Check this out!

Sort-of a reblog here, but something worth sharing with the community. It’s actually an older post from Geek and Sundry dating from May 2016 that I’ve just seen a week or so ago.

Anyway, the long and short of it is that there are a ton of free designs up for grabs. Or to repeat G&S’s headline:

ARTIST RELEASES 300 PRINTABLE D&D MINIATURE PATTERNS. FOR FREE.

Zombie Beholder. Image Credit – Miguel Zavala

So anyway, I’m not trying to steal G&S’ clicks. So if you’re interested, go have a look at their article and then on to Shapeways to download the patterns for that day when you finally get a 3D printer, in case they’ve been taken down by then.