Iron Warriors Chaos Space Marines – Obliterators #2

Iron Warriors Chaos Space Marine Obliterator

Obliterators.

They’re not good models, and we all know this. The current models aren’t that old, but they’re old enough to have been retired and replaced with models that aren’t shit. These models are less shit than the original ones – those are really shit, but these ones are shit too. Just less so. Still, I updated/resurrected my original pair just over a year ago, and they’re obviously a thing in the new Chaos army, just as they were before, so I finally forced myself to find and dig out another one of them to complete the squad, since these days they’re entirely bought in sets of three.

I did change out the head (again) in order to make the model look a little more “Iron Warriors” and a little less “hot garbage”. This is a MKIII head from Forge World. I think it was from an Iron Hands kit. I do think it improves the appearance of the model significantly.

Iron Warriors Chaos Space Marine Obliterator

Just as I mentioned last time, I really dislike the random weapon-spam look of their arms, and so just as I was a bit more judicious with the others I assembled over a decade ago, I was again with this one. Twin-linked bolters on one arm, with ammunition magazines sticking out of the side. (Wait.. so how does he reload? Shh.. don’t think. The model is awful. It’s a meat-man. Don’t think. Don’t use your brain here…)

Iron Warriors Chaos Space Marine Obliterator

There might have originally been a decent sculpt underneath all of that, before the sculptor covered their sculpt in too much greenstuff. I will say that I think painting it like meat makes it look less bad than GW’s go-to of pinkish flesh. Which isn’t to say that this is good looking. If you look carefully, you can see the dented left shoulder where I accidentally dropped the model wen in the final stages of finishing it. Somehow it dented the shoulder without damaging the paint. It’s certainly a heavy hunk of metal, in any case.

Iron Warriors Chaos Space Marine Obliterator

…and the left arm. Again I’ve gone both minimalist and attempted to make the arm look less rubbish. In this case by using two melta barrel ends I found in a bits box – from converting metal Imperial Guardsmen back in the 1990’s. It actually kinda almost looks okay here, and as I’ve mentioned I’ve been practising a few times lately – another couple of heat-discoloured weapon barrels.

Iron Warriors Chaos Space Marine Obliterator

So now I have a trio. The three models required to legally field the Obliterators as a unit in 8th edition Warhammer 40,000. I’ve got more of these models. A bunch of finecast ones bought cheaply secondhand. I planned to make them into Mutilators, but I’m not sure if:

a) Mutilators are worthwhile in 8th

b) I can really be bothered to build and mildly convert them into something passable. I guess I have some spare parts from Ork Mega Armoured Nobz.

c) Which army to build them for. Despite the confluence of the Iron Warriors and the (groan) Obliterator Virus in the lore, I feel like they’re a bit gribbly for my Iron Warriors. Or to have to many of in my Iron Warriors. I’ve also got all those Dark Vengeance models that are a bit too …Chaosy for my Iron Warriors, so I need to decide on a Non-Mono-aligned Fallen Legion to go with my Traitor Legion. Which I guess will be Word Bearers, since I’m disqualifying the four Chosen Legions, I already have the IW, I have specific plans for a small force of Alphas and Black Legion, and I don’t really connect with the Night Lords (and they’re in many ways more murder-y than chaos-y).

If I loved the models, then a) and b) would not be an issue. As it happens, it’s much more the case of “I’ve got them, let’s see if I can be motivated to assemble and paint them.” So… yeah.

Iron Warriors Warsmith (2001)

Iron Warriors Warsmith (2001), Chaos Space Marine Lord, Warpsmith

Next up, the Iron Warriors Warsmith model. Quite an old model at this point, it dates from way back in 3rd edition 40k, more specifically the 3.5 codex release in 2002 (models are obviously sculpted some time in advance). This is one of several of this model that I’ve accumulated over the years. My first one I converted into an Exalted Champion (for 3rd) who I’ve been using as a Chaos Lord in our 8th edition games to date. I’ve also got one that I picked up from eBay as a bare torso, sans arms and pack, and one more, still in the blister to be used later. This one I actually got second-hand & assembled when I bought a some of a local guy’s Iron Warriors many years ago. I picked up this figure, a Rhino, a (converted) Vindicator (based on the Forge World kit of the day), and the Dreadnought/Hellbrute that I’ve been working on very slowly for Dreadtober.

Iron Warriors Warsmith (2001), Chaos Space Marine Lord, Warpsmith

So yeah, I’ve had this figure for over a decade, and again, as part of the finding and finishing 40k figures and putting them into armies that I’ve been up to lately, I finally got this guy done. As per usual, I remounted him onto one of the new Sector Imperialis bases. As he’s got quite a lot of cabling on him, I wanted to make some of them a little distinct without doing the whole “skittles” thing.

Iron Warriors Warsmith (2001), Chaos Space Marine Lord, Warpsmith

It’s a nice model but rather a busy one. Of course, adding in the hazard stripes of the Iron Warriors does nothing but make the model even more busy.

Iron Warriors Warsmith (2001), Chaos Space Marine Lord, Warpsmith

Interestingly, and sort-of amusingly for the “no model, no rules” crowd, this model doesn’t actually have rules in the 8th Edition of 40k – despite still being sold (as you could see from the link to GW at the top of the page). Sooo… I guess I’ll just use him with the Warpsmith rules. Which isn’t quite the same thing in the background (or equipment) but close enough, I suppose.

Iron Warriors Warsmith (2001), Chaos Space Marine Lord, Warpsmith, Narik Dreygur, Dark Apostle

We now have a trio of heroes for the Iron Warriors. The War(p)smith, Nârik Dreygur: Exalted Champion, and the model who I’ve been using as a Chaos Lord, who will now slot into the role of Dark Apostle. It seems more appropriate for that model’s build, after all. And yes, this means that a new Lord for the Iron Warriors is in the making sometime soon.

Despite my general dislike of changing models for new rules and new editions, I did buckle and replace the Bolt Pistol on the Chaos Lord (Dark Apostle) recently. He now has a Plasma Pistol as a small but effective upgrade.

Orktober 2017 Finale: Group Shot!

Rogue Trader-era Kev Adams Space Orks, Oldhammer, Brian Nelson 40k Slugga Boyz

A quick and dirty post today – Just something fun to show off all of the Orks that I’ve recently painted in a group shot. Da Boyz are certainly back in town! By the time their codex comes out, I’m hoping that I should be well on my way to a small (points-wise) but playable force. I’m quite pleased how well the Orks from such different eras work together as a group. Consistent basing and an overall shared palette/theme really make a difference!

Orktober 2017 #6/WAAAAGH! Pt.6: 40k Ork Slugga Boyz.

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

And yep, another three Orks today. I figured that I could have shown all six in one post on a 2-day turnaround, or just post them three at a time over two days. So I’m doing the latter to give them all a bit more space. Besides, they took me long enough to get finished, so I’m good with giving them a bit more individual showcase. It’s not like it’ll happen for these models again as any new posts with them will either be much larger group shots or battle reports, so I’ll give the hours of work these guys took their moment in the spotlight. 😛

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

As with yesterday’s camo schemes, we’ve got British Desert DPM and three variations on that Yugoslav “puzzle” pattern, all with different palettes. The idea is that when these Orks are all mixed together, they’ll all be unique yet unified by their camo gear. Besides, even with Blood Axes, I can’t see Orks being better at wearing unified camo than, say Russian troops. 😉

Orktober 2017 #5/WAAAAGH! Pt.5: 40k Ork Slugga Boyz.

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

Three more Slugga Boyz again today. I literally finished these off yesterday, so I bumped them up in the blog post queue so I could “Orktober” them. (I’ve gone from having not much to show to a backlog of stuff to show again.) Not much to write here that I haven’t already said before. A mix of 40k and Fantasy bits used again, as well as muted palette and camo schemes.

Warhammer 40k Ork Slugga Boyz

Our leftmost Ork wears UK Desert DPM, the middle one wears an AUSCAM top with a made-up camo on his pants, and the third Ork has that same made-up camo on his top and a different made-up camo for his pants. Both of the “made-up” camo schemes are (loosely) based on the Yugoslav variant of the “puzzle” pattern of camouflage – though both with 3-colours and my own arid-themed palettes.

Orktober 2017 #3: RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master Thrugg Bullneck (1988)

RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master (1988) Kev Adams Rogue Trader Orks

I know, I know. The title “discipline-master” makes it seem like this orc should be the one armed with the whip and not the other Ork I posted up. This guy, known as Thrugg Bullneck (thanks Alex – I couldn’t recall his name despite looking for it) is the commander model from the very first Space Ork boxed set (and the second 40k box set ever) RTB02 Space Ork Raiders. In (the original volume of) Chapter Approved: Book of the Astronomican, this model and the other like him were the example models for Discipline Master (Sub-Chief) who had Ork Hero level stats. While he’s not huge compared to modern Brian Nelson Orks, he stands high over the rest of the models from the Space Ork Raiders box.

RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master (1988) Kev Adams Rogue Trader Orks

For his camo I’ve given him Desert Auscam, and attempted to give his gear some contrast to his skin by using reddish leather trim and brass/copper/bronze for his bling and scale armour – but without going all the way to actual red. Rather than going with the traditional old-school red for his plasma pistol, I went with a more muted dark turquiose. It still (sort of) stands out from the rest of his gear, but without being garish against his camo and overall more muted tones.

RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master (1988) Kev Adams Rogue Trader Orks

Looking at this model even then, but especially today the closed pose of it really stands out. Arms and weapons folded around the Ork’s torso, yet it still manages to look like a badass that you would not want to mess with. As with most Orks of the day, rather than boots, he’s got puttees wrapped around his feet from his toes almost to his knees. This was Kev Adams’ style on the fantasy orcs that he sculpted in those days, and something that directly carried over to almost all of the original Ork line.

RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master (1988) Kev Adams Rogue Trader Orks

This particular model is one I’ve had for decades, since I was a young teen first discovering the original Rogue Trader. One of the first 40k models I ever collected. The rest of his original cohorts were sold off many years ago, but he was one I kept out of fondness. He’s been painted (in enamels) then stripped, then boxed, then bagged, then boxed again into storage. With a lot of years in each of those. After so many years, he’s back, rebased on a 32, and most importantly painted and ready for the table again!

RTB02 Space Ork Raiders Discipline-Master (1988), Ork Mek, Mekaniak, Rogue Trader Orks, Kev Adams

And for good measure, here’s the three old-school Rogue Trader Orks together. I hope to get some more of these guys done this year, but the painting queue is pretty full, so I’ll make myself finish more of the other Orks I started years ago before I begin any more old-school Orks from scratch!

Orktober 2017 #2: Rogue Trader-era Kev Adams Space Ork Mekaniak (440206 – April 1989)

Rogue Trader Kev Adams Space Ork Mekaniak Mekboy April 1989

What? Dreadtober? Yeah, I’m working on that, too. Just clearing some stuff off the paint desk first, though.. This particular Ork happens to be the very first Ork Mekboy. Known initially at the time as a “Mekaniak” “Mek Boy” and “Mekboy”, he came included in a kit with the first Wartrak and a field gun, also known around the same time as a “Hop Splat Gun”. When I sold off most of my Orks back in the day, this fellow was one of the figures that I kept, along with the pair of gretchin slaves that go with him. (I need to dig them out and paint them up!)

Rogue Trader Kev Adams Space Ork Mekaniak Mekboy April 1989

This particular Ork was originally painted back in the day, stripped, and then stored in various boxes and cases for the next few decades. As with his companion that I shared here the other day, he’s finally out and painted to a standard that I’m happy with – and he’ll be joining the WAAAGH at some stage as well. While it’s certainly true that he’s pretty basic by the standards of modern Mekboys, I’ll have a good look through the Index (or maybe Codex, if it comes out this year – fingers crossed) and see if there’s a suitable spot for him. The whip makes him a potential Runtherd, though I think I’m well covered for that spot, at least for the time being.

Rogue Trader Kev Adams Space Ork Mekaniak Mekboy April 1989

Once again, bare metal, earth tones and camo are what make up the colours of his gear. His ammo pouches seem to be modelled after the FG-42 pouches and webbing, right down to the Y-harness – which makes a lot of sense I guess, as Orks from the originals through to part of second edition weren’t shy about taking inspiration for some of their elements from German sources. (Stormboys obviously being the most egregious example.)

Rogue Trader Kev Adams Space Ork Mekaniak Mekboy April 1989

Regardless, I always really liked this sculpt and even to this day I still love it. There’s just something so impassive and at the same time brutal and threatening about it. Not a figure that needs to be overblown to impart a sense of menace.