15mm Flames of War Battlefield in a Box – Desert Walls, Ruined Desert Walls – Weathered & Repainted (BB223, BB229)

15mm Flames of War Battlefield in a Box – Desert Walls, Ruined Desert Walls - Weathered & Repainted (BB223, BB229)

These are the last of my “desert buildings” stuff from Gale Force 9/Battlefield in a Box (until I get a few more, later on). We’ve got two sets of Desert Walls and one of Ruined Desert Walls here that I’ve spent a little bit of time weathering and touching up. As you can see here, the walls alone cover a good chunk of table space. Once combined with buildings, other terrain and spaced out, I reckon there’s easily enough for most game table setups here.

15mm Flames of War Battlefield in a Box – Desert Walls - Weathered & Repainted (BB223)

A whole bunch of standard walls with grime added to the lower area as well as rain streaking.

15mm Flames of War Battlefield in a Box – Ruined Desert Walls - Weathered & Repainted (BB229)

I’ve got fewer of the ruined walls – I’m planning on getting one more set of these which should give me a lot more table options in terms of ruined areas.

15mm Flames of War Battlefield in a Box – Desert Walls, Ruined Desert Walls - Weathered & Repainted (BB223, BB229)

Here’s the short walls from all three sets. Griming all of these up wasn’t difficult, but it was bloody tedious!

Here’s the gist of it on the left – doing this with Vallejo Track Primer and/or vallejo Panzergrau primer, via make-up drybrush, then using heavily watered down Panzergrau for streaks. Like I said, not difficult but bloody tedious!

15mm Flames of War Battlefield in a Box – Desert Walls, Ruined Desert Walls - Weathered & Repainted (BB223, BB229)

I also figure that a scale shot is something useful to have here – the walls next to an array of reasonably popular models. I think the well could be used in 28mm gaming, as can both sets of walls. The gates only work for Hobbits and perhaps Goblins and Gnoblars. The larger walls are a bit too high for troops to see and shoot over, unlike the typical chest-high walls found in 40k, etc (though the ruined walls can be used in that way). The smaller walls are functionally probably best kept ignored, but can potentially add to a tabletop’s aesthetic. Even the bricks don’t look out of place!

Well, that’s another large amount of terrain parts now done and now packed away into my FoW Storage, ready to hit the tabletop (hopefully) soon! If Dave’s happy to count this sort of thing, I did these in the final days of December, so I’ll submit them for Dave Stone’s Paint What You Got challenge, running from Dec 26th through to Jan 31st. Don’t worry! I have real models coming soon as well! 😉

12 thoughts on “15mm Flames of War Battlefield in a Box – Desert Walls, Ruined Desert Walls – Weathered & Repainted (BB223, BB229)

  1. Very effective mate, the weathering elevates the standard paint a lot. Of course they count for the challenge, as it required you adding paint, and would be no different than finishing a half painted model.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks John – in situations like this (will I have enough walls?) I just find it easier to buy a second set of the thing so I know I’ll always have enough of [thing] to be able to create whatever setup I was after.. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. As I’ve said before, the touches you add to these terrain pieces really elevate them. I would also say that having walls like these is so helpful. I’ve seen many wargames that require quite a lot of them and you can’t play those scenarios if you don’t have them!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Nice! Thanks for the scale shot too, most of that stuff looks surprisingly useful for 28mm – even the low walls could serve as a kind of decorative park wall you see around footpaths in gardens etc.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, that’s what I was thiking as well about the smaller ones – no gameplay effect but an aesthetic enhancement – which is worthwhile on it’s own merits! They’d work well with a Carribean theme as well I think! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

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