Realm of Chaos – Nurgle’s Children 2021 #25, D&D Monster Manual 57: 44116: Thrasher Snail (Reaper Bones Black) as Proxy Beast of Nurgle #Monstermarch5

Reaper Bones Black 44116: Thrasher Snail, Proxy Beast of Nurgle

Long enough post title for you? Sheesh, yeah!

Today’s model has a few layers of “what is this one?” in it. More than you’d expect for a simple snail model, anyway. The official name of this model from the Reaper Bones 4 campaign is “Thrasher Snail“, though as with a huge proportion of Reaper’s stuff, it’s their “Not-” version of a D&D monster, just renamed to avoid copyright issues. In this case, it’s a Not-Flail Snail. So that’s all pretty straightforward to start. However, as I’m much more of a Warhammer guy than a D&D guy, when I saw this thing, the poorly-cast flails did trip me up for several months as I scratched my head on this low-import figure trying to clean them up properly, and then figure out how to assemble them, as I just didn’t like the look of the flails.

Reaper Bones Black 44116: Thrasher Snail, Proxy Beast of Nurgle

So last weekend, motivated to get the thing painted now and finally by both Swordmaster’s Monster March and Ann’s “Neglected But Not Forgotten” painting challenges, I decided to just say “fuck it” and forget about the flails, fill in some of the holes on the sides of the snail’s head, and give it a lovely twisted unicorn-style horn to make it fit in with how I’d always planned to use the model anyway – as a Beast of Nurgle. I did need to do some carving to assemble it, as it didn’t fit together nicely. I found that adding the Bones Black to boiling water softened it enough so that my hobby knife cut through it very easily, as opposed to it being closer to resin in regards to resistance to a blade (though not shatter-fragility) when at normal room temperature.

Reaper Bones Black 44116: Thrasher Snail, Proxy Beast of Nurgle

Once I’d made that call, painting was a little tedious in painting the striations onto the shell before adding multiple glazes (and some Contrast), but overall a breeze that went quickly and easily, and was simple enough that I was able to add a layer here and there before work and after work even when bloody tired and not really in the mood to put brush to plastic.

Reaper Bones Black 44116: Thrasher Snail, Proxy Beast of Nurgle

In the end, this was a nice quick project that adds one more model to my very slowly growing Nurgle Daemonic horde.

As an addemdum, fellow blogger Imperial Rebel Ork (or, IRO) has asked people to post up some of their favourite t-shirts. I’m currenly in a state of T-Flux, but I did manage to find a few that kinda fit well enough to wear, and so here are a couple of them, with my ugly mug suitably covered so as to not scare small children and pets.

Reaper Bones 4: Dreadmere Expansion – 44031: Giant Leeches (Contrast Paint Experiments #18)

Reaper Bones 4: Dreadmere Expansion - 44031 Giant Leeches

Another quick one here – this pair of Sea-Wormy things – Apparently they’re Giant Leeches – thanks to maledrakh for that! (and no thanks to Reaper’s shitty minis tagging) – came from the Dreadmere Expansion of Reaper’s 4th Bones Kickstarter. They’re …okay models, and a decent size (sorry, forgot to take a scale reference shot, but those bases are 25mm). Detail is a little soft, and there are visible mold lines which I did the best I could without putting in more effort than the models deserve. I couldn’t find the “proper” names of these anywhere on the KS pages, nor on Reaper’s site, so I went with “say what you see”.

Reaper Bones 4: Dreadmere Expansion - 44031 Giant Leeches

For painting I went with a thinned down Contrast Volpus Pink with the usual Contrast Medium added in over what was either Wraithbone or AK Interactive WHite Spray (that part of the job was months ago). Even after the Contrast, it still looked a bit dull, so I drybrushed over it with some Vallejo Model Colour Ivory. Like a lot of the random stuff that comes out of Bones, I have no specific use for these, though I’m sure I can drop them into a bunch of different games as appropriate.

Similarly, as a pair of low-detail Bones models with no specific use, I could have done a lot better with them but went for the quick and easy win combined with learning a little more about how the Contrasts will work on different types of models and different sizes and shapes. These look fine as far as a simple Tabletop quality job, which is good enough for me. I’ve got plenty of more important models to put proper time and care into, after all! 😉