Speed Freeks Scrap Piles #3 (January Terrain 2019)

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Today I have the third and final set of four scrap piles from the Speed Freeks/Mek Workshop set. I’ve still got the walls (four sets of three) as well as the Mek Workshop itself to do, but the walls vary between sprayed metallic across to still needing to be cleaned up, and nobody ain’t got time for that shit right now. I’ll do it when I go back to work to make lunchtimes and meetings more bearable. Same deal with the Ryza Ruins which will soon be bolstered with that new Kill Team stuff.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

The techniques are identical to the previous two sets, posted recently. I’d hoped to get these posted up yesterday, but by the time I got the table cleared of the class of 2018, it was 9pm, I hadn’t eaten a meal since breakfast, and I was generally not in the right mood to photograph, photo edit or write a post. So you get ’em today, instead!

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Unlike the other two sizes of debris piles, these ones are too large to fit two of them into my light box – hence all of the single pics.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Those piles of tyres get a bit repetitive, don’t they? This shot is really a great example of the drawbacks of GW’s plastic moulding tech and the lack of undercuts. It also really illustrates how these pieces are designed to be viewed from above – that “looking down on the models” or “God’s-Eye” perspective that we have as players.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Here’s another chipped paint close-up to go with the header pic.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

It ain’t so pretty close up. Which I guess is kinda the point, so it’s all good.

Here they are all laid out on a section of a wargame table.I’m happy with how they look – not too repetitive at all, considering we have only three sculpts of debris there. The orientation and paint disguise the repetitiveness rather nicely, I think.

And with a simulated battle between two Kill-Teams, fighting over the important tech located amongst the scrapheaps. When combined with other terrain on a real table, I think this stuff will look pretty bloody good, if I don’t say so myself!

That’s it for now for these. I’ll get onto the walls and the actual Mek Workshop in a month or two. No time for cleaning the mould lines off that crap right now, and way too much still to do!

Speed Freeks Scrap Piles #2 (January Terrain 2019)

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Today I have the next four sets of Scrap/Debris piles from the Speed Freeks/Mekboy Workshop sets. Same ethos as the ones I showed the other day – keep ’em interesting visually through use of colour and details – and most importantly – unique enough so that they can share a tabletop without looking like stamped clones.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Both sides of this pair.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

…and both sides of this pair.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Faust was asking about the paint chipping in the comments of the other post, and while it’s too late to do a proper tutorial on these (maybe on the walls in the future) I can still explain what I did to get the effect on these pieces.

  1. Spray Black
  2. Spray Dark Metallic
  3. Spray in an “iron” colour. Like silver, but not overly bright. I didn’t use Leadbelcher spray, but it would work perfectly for this.
  4. Drybrush the metal bits you’ll want to be extra shiny, post-chipping with silver.
  5. Heavy gloss varnish spray
  6. OPTIONAL: Paint over the bits you want to chip with PVA for more fragmented/crackled paint – I did this on some pieces but not on others.
  7. Mix Crackle Paint Medium with your chosen colour. It’s gloopy and thick and horrible. I used Greenstuff World’s medium. It’s probably the same with Vallejo or Jo Sonja or whoever else.
  8. Apply carefully over your chosen coloured area. Let Dry.
  9. Repeat 7-8 for all the colours you’re going to use on that piece, it just makes life easier later on.
  10. Shade and highlight those colours.
  11. Now the fun begins! Find something that’s not too sharp (I used a sculpting tool) and use some of the cracks to chip away at the paint. The extra-thick bits are also good. Pay extra attention to edges and dents in the sculpt, as places like that are more likely to have paint wear and chipping. Try not to gouge into the plastic, but even if you do it can be touched up. When you’re happy, stop.
  12. Weather, add rust (powders).
  13. Heavy gloss spray
  14. Matte Spray.

The first of the heavy gloss sprays is to protect the black and silver base from the fact that you’ll be gouging away on top shortly. The last one is because it’s scenery, and so is likely to be more roughly handled than your normal, nice models.

Hope this is useful! Since I’ve done most of the work writing it up, I’m sure I’ll be able to recycle the text with a photographically-illustrated tutorial down the line!

Speed Freeks Scrap Piles #1 (January Terrain 2019)

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Since my copies of Speed Freeks arrived back in November, along with the Mekboy Workshop, I spent quite a number of work lunchtimes and meetings busily scraping and cutting away mould lines and bits of sprue to get them ready to paint. With what amounted to four sets of the terrain, that came to 4 large piles of Scrap/debris, 4 medium ones and 4 small ones. As well as that there’s 4 large Scrap walls, 4 medium and 4 small. Then there’s the actual Mekboy Workshop.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

That amounts to 25 individual bits of terrain that I’ve slowly been working on, bit by bit, since November. Yesterday, I finally completed the first four of them. The rest are at various stages of completion, from nearly-almost-so-close-to-done, to only clipped off the sprue and still needing to have those mould lines scraped off. With that in mind, I’m going to post them as I finish each “set”. So these are the first ones.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

There were basically three things I wanted to do with these sets: Did I say two? I meant three. THREE!!

1) Use enough colour to make the small details more distinctive than having them simply be piles of drybrushed silver. I’ve got plenty enough that will be following that scheme later. These have screwdrivers and pliers that you can make out!

2) Paint them so that they easily fit into  ̶G̶o̶r̶k̶a̶ ̶M̶o̶r̶k̶a̶ Speed Freeks, Necromunda, 40k… Fallout, Mad Max, any sci-fi, post-apoc, etc

3) Make each one unique.

Because why not, eh?

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Having 24/5 pieces to do, and the level of detail that I want to use means it’s taking me a lot longer to get done than a single set, so I’ll be showing the debris piles over the next few days, or week, or however long. Some of the walls have been started, some need to be cleaned up, the Mekboy Workshop is still on the sprue. So for that reason, this project will be another “series”until they’re done. Probably posted with each “set” of duplicated pieces until they’re all done.

Unfortunately, my last can of Testor’s Dullcote ran out just before I sprayed these, so despite the heavy coat of gloss and the satin coat that followed the weathering powders, they’re a little more shiny(ish) than I’d like. I’m still calling them done, though – as everything I finish from here on in (especially scenery) will need that final coat once I get hold of the stuff, which could still be a couple of weeks – and I plan to have a lot more scenery done before January is finished!

WAAAAGH! Pt.15: GorkaMorka Snotz as 40k Gretchin. (Brian Nelson, 1999) (Neglected Model May ’18)

GorkaMorka Snotz, 40k Gretchin, Brian Nelson, 1999

These little fellas have been on the go since 2005. They were part of the Ork Combat Patrol force that I was working on when my brother passed away, which got boxed away until last year when I was ready to start working on them again – which almost all of these WAAAAGH! series posts are. I’m very happy to have finally finished them off over the past few days, which included rebasing all of them. These figures aren’t “proper” gretchin, in fact (as the post title has already told you) “Snotz” from GorkaMorka in 1999. Which means I started painting them only about 6 years after buying them, which for me is actually pretty good.

GorkaMorka Snotz, 40k Gretchin, Brian Nelson, 1999

They’re based on little 20mm round bases. While rebasing them from their original GorkaMorka “football” grot bases, I did briefly try one out on a regular 25mm base, but it looked absolutely ridiculous, but fine on a 20mm base. I did have to order some more of them, as I only had a few from a Red Box Games order a couple of years ago. I’m sure they’re legal enough in the current version of 40k, as GW doesn’t seem too fussed about base size anymore.

GorkaMorka Snotz, 40k Gretchin, Brian Nelson, 1999I do recall when I showed the WIP versions of these models many years ago (must have been on DA-WAAGH forums) one guy told me that I had them on illegal bases, and then another guy chimed in stating that GW had said that any model could always be used on either the bases they came with, a larger base than that, or whatever the current base size was. Clearly a way to grandfather in things like the Rogue Trader-era terminators, or Abaddon the Despoiler, who originally came on a 25mm base. (I should really paint one of mine!)

GorkaMorka Snotz, 40k Gretchin, Brian Nelson, 1999

Now one thing that’s hard to miss is just how bloody luminous they are. Something that was a part of older Orc/Ork fluff was that essentially, the bigger and tougher an Ork was, the darker their skin became. Obviously the pinnacle of this sort of thing were Warbosses in 40k, and Black Orcs in Fantasy. On the other end of this spectrum was that goblins/gretchin tended to be lighter and brighter, and obviously snotlings are even moreso.

GorkaMorka Snotz, 40k Gretchin, Brian Nelson, 1999

Why so many photos of the 4 sculpts x4? Because look at them! They’re snotlings! No-one is ever going to look at them as much as a few people online have just looked at them right here right now. Certainly not on the table when there’s other big and eye-catching stuff there, but at the same time there’s a lot of work here. This is their brief moment in the sun. At some point I’ll get onto the “proper” gretchin models that I have from Rogue Trader and 2nd Edition, as well as the tidy collection of GorkaKorka gretchin, vehicles and of course Da Red Gobbo.

GorkaMorka Snotz, 40k Gretchin, Runtherd, Brian Nelson, 1999

In the meantime, here they are with their Runtherd, also from the GorkaMorka range. Having completed these models, I’m left with only one more figure from that original warband – the Warboss. He’s been on the painting table again for the last few days, so my hope is to finish him off in the next few days and then get him posted up here. varnishing him is going to be a problem with the current UK weather that has somehow made its way down here to Australia (actually, today’s downpour and cold comes from Antarctica). Wish me luck!

WAAAAGH! Pt.4: GorkaMorka Slaver a.k.a. Ork Runtherd (1998)

Citadel GorkaMorka Slaver, 40k Ork Runtherd, Brian Nelson (1998)

A bit of a slow week this last couple of weeks for posts as I had exhausted my backlog of recently-painted-but-unshown models, and to be blunt had a bit of the old blogging-burnout. I’ll slowly catch up on people’s posts and keep on painting here to get more new models finished. Still, I do have something today – one of the models I’d planned to complete a couple of weekends ago but only managed to do during the week. This guy is from the GorkaMorka range, which was a side game of GW’s (now known as “Specialist Games”) and the sort-of successor and replacement for Necromunda in their release schedule. GM never took off like Necromunda did, and my group never actually played it at all, which I felt was a shame, since it looked like a fair bit of fun. I did, however pick up a ton of GM kits, which I guess might start to be assembled and painted now that I’m resurrecting the Orks.

Citadel GorkaMorka Slaver, 40k Ork Runtherd, Brian Nelson (1998)

Palette-wise, I kept him fairly simple and muted. A robe that started as off-white before being dirtied up quite a bit, some leather gubbins and the old Pilot’s cap all in browns finished him off.

Of course, Bruce Spence’s iconic character of the Gyro Captain is a visible inspiration for this figure’s look – not to mention several other Orks through the years. Of course, Mad Max 2 has been a huge influence over much of popular culture in general and 40k in particular – and especially so for Orks. I mean Just Look Anywhere.

Citadel GorkaMorka Slaver, 40k Ork Runtherd, Brian Nelson (1998)

Ork Slavers are generally also called Runtherds, and have been so since the RT days. One thing that is for sure is this figure was called “Ork Slaver” for it’s GM release. So this means there’s something missing here!

Citadel GorkaMorka Slaver, 40k Ork Runtherd, Brian Nelson (1998)

Now at this stage I don’t have any runts ready for this guy to herd …yet. But rest assured, when they get sorted out, this guy will make an appropriate reappearance here on the blog.

Citadel GorkaMorka Slaver, 40k Ork Runtherd, Brian Nelson (1998)

He’s comin’ ta getcha!