Speed Freeks Scrap Piles #3 (January Terrain 2019)

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Today I have the third and final set of four scrap piles from the Speed Freeks/Mek Workshop set. I’ve still got the walls (four sets of three) as well as the Mek Workshop itself to do, but the walls vary between sprayed metallic across to still needing to be cleaned up, and nobody ain’t got time for that shit right now. I’ll do it when I go back to work to make lunchtimes and meetings more bearable. Same deal with the Ryza Ruins which will soon be bolstered with that new Kill Team stuff.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

The techniques are identical to the previous two sets, posted recently. I’d hoped to get these posted up yesterday, but by the time I got the table cleared of the class of 2018, it was 9pm, I hadn’t eaten a meal since breakfast, and I was generally not in the right mood to photograph, photo edit or write a post. So you get ’em today, instead!

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Unlike the other two sizes of debris piles, these ones are too large to fit two of them into my light box – hence all of the single pics.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Those piles of tyres get a bit repetitive, don’t they? This shot is really a great example of the drawbacks of GW’s plastic moulding tech and the lack of undercuts. It also really illustrates how these pieces are designed to be viewed from above – that “looking down on the models” or “God’s-Eye” perspective that we have as players.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Here’s another chipped paint close-up to go with the header pic.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

It ain’t so pretty close up. Which I guess is kinda the point, so it’s all good.

Here they are all laid out on a section of a wargame table.I’m happy with how they look – not too repetitive at all, considering we have only three sculpts of debris there. The orientation and paint disguise the repetitiveness rather nicely, I think.

And with a simulated battle between two Kill-Teams, fighting over the important tech located amongst the scrapheaps. When combined with other terrain on a real table, I think this stuff will look pretty bloody good, if I don’t say so myself!

That’s it for now for these. I’ll get onto the walls and the actual Mek Workshop in a month or two. No time for cleaning the mould lines off that crap right now, and way too much still to do!

Speed Freeks Scrap Piles #2 (January Terrain 2019)

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Today I have the next four sets of Scrap/Debris piles from the Speed Freeks/Mekboy Workshop sets. Same ethos as the ones I showed the other day – keep ’em interesting visually through use of colour and details – and most importantly – unique enough so that they can share a tabletop without looking like stamped clones.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Both sides of this pair.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

…and both sides of this pair.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Faust was asking about the paint chipping in the comments of the other post, and while it’s too late to do a proper tutorial on these (maybe on the walls in the future) I can still explain what I did to get the effect on these pieces.

  1. Spray Black
  2. Spray Dark Metallic
  3. Spray in an “iron” colour. Like silver, but not overly bright. I didn’t use Leadbelcher spray, but it would work perfectly for this.
  4. Drybrush the metal bits you’ll want to be extra shiny, post-chipping with silver.
  5. Heavy gloss varnish spray
  6. OPTIONAL: Paint over the bits you want to chip with PVA for more fragmented/crackled paint – I did this on some pieces but not on others.
  7. Mix Crackle Paint Medium with your chosen colour. It’s gloopy and thick and horrible. I used Greenstuff World’s medium. It’s probably the same with Vallejo or Jo Sonja or whoever else.
  8. Apply carefully over your chosen coloured area. Let Dry.
  9. Repeat 7-8 for all the colours you’re going to use on that piece, it just makes life easier later on.
  10. Shade and highlight those colours.
  11. Now the fun begins! Find something that’s not too sharp (I used a sculpting tool) and use some of the cracks to chip away at the paint. The extra-thick bits are also good. Pay extra attention to edges and dents in the sculpt, as places like that are more likely to have paint wear and chipping. Try not to gouge into the plastic, but even if you do it can be touched up. When you’re happy, stop.
  12. Weather, add rust (powders).
  13. Heavy gloss spray
  14. Matte Spray.

The first of the heavy gloss sprays is to protect the black and silver base from the fact that you’ll be gouging away on top shortly. The last one is because it’s scenery, and so is likely to be more roughly handled than your normal, nice models.

Hope this is useful! Since I’ve done most of the work writing it up, I’m sure I’ll be able to recycle the text with a photographically-illustrated tutorial down the line!