Speed Freeks Scrap Piles #3 (January Terrain 2019)

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Today I have the third and final set of four scrap piles from the Speed Freeks/Mek Workshop set. I’ve still got the walls (four sets of three) as well as the Mek Workshop itself to do, but the walls vary between sprayed metallic across to still needing to be cleaned up, and nobody ain’t got time for that shit right now. I’ll do it when I go back to work to make lunchtimes and meetings more bearable. Same deal with the Ryza Ruins which will soon be bolstered with that new Kill Team stuff.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

The techniques are identical to the previous two sets, posted recently. I’d hoped to get these posted up yesterday, but by the time I got the table cleared of the class of 2018, it was 9pm, I hadn’t eaten a meal since breakfast, and I was generally not in the right mood to photograph, photo edit or write a post. So you get ’em today, instead!

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Unlike the other two sizes of debris piles, these ones are too large to fit two of them into my light box – hence all of the single pics.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Those piles of tyres get a bit repetitive, don’t they? This shot is really a great example of the drawbacks of GW’s plastic moulding tech and the lack of undercuts. It also really illustrates how these pieces are designed to be viewed from above – that “looking down on the models” or “God’s-Eye” perspective that we have as players.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

Here’s another chipped paint close-up to go with the header pic.

Speed Freeks Mekboy Workshop Scrap Debris Piles

It ain’t so pretty close up. Which I guess is kinda the point, so it’s all good.

Here they are all laid out on a section of a wargame table.I’m happy with how they look – not too repetitive at all, considering we have only three sculpts of debris there. The orientation and paint disguise the repetitiveness rather nicely, I think.

And with a simulated battle between two Kill-Teams, fighting over the important tech located amongst the scrapheaps. When combined with other terrain on a real table, I think this stuff will look pretty bloody good, if I don’t say so myself!

That’s it for now for these. I’ll get onto the walls and the actual Mek Workshop in a month or two. No time for cleaning the mould lines off that crap right now, and way too much still to do!

35 thoughts on “Speed Freeks Scrap Piles #3 (January Terrain 2019)

  1. More fantastic work on the terrain pieces! I love how the finished piles basically make half a table or more of skirmish terrain! Plus I now feel like an INQ28 game set in a scrapyard on some backwater planet would be rather cool. Just add some verticality (a couple of freight containers linked by walkways, an industrial crane,…), and you’re there!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Walkways, you say…?
      Ahem. Yeah, they combine really nicely for a decent amount of table space – much like the Shardwrack Spines did once I got a couple of kits – and much like those, they’ll really come into their own when combined with a few other, theme-appropriate kits.

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  2. Looking good. As has been mentioned, good job mixing them up. This seems like the hardest lot to do that with, since there are only so many ways to paint tires (especially since Orks aren’t really the type to go in for whitewalls), and that stack of them really dominates that one side of the pile.

    And yeah, I’ve noticed (and been annoyed by) the way that some GW stuff only really looks right from one angle, and from others, it’s all distorted because of the way it needed to work for the mold.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yeah, I’m noticing it more and more on the newer bits of terrain. That skully-statue-thing from the Shadespire terrain is another example. It could just be that it’s more obvious now because GW is turning out more terrain kits than ever before now. Still, the new ones at least lack the “huge hole to nowhere” that some of their older terrain did…

      Liked by 1 person

      • The other place I really see it a lot is on Models with slung weapons. So often, there’s a big chunk in-between the strap and the body of the Model that’s a real pain to disguise with paint.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Ah ok, now I think I understand what Azazel was talking about. Basically when they extend parts of a model to make up for the depth. Which I don’t if what I just typed makes any sense. It looks like that central tire might be a good example, where it is much taller than it should be.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Yep. You can also see it on the pipes and (I think) shock absorbers on the left of the top two pics. They look fine in the one from above, but from the side, they’re clearly not cylinders.

          Liked by 1 person

        • I haven’t come across that all that much (yet) of the sling weapons & straps-type issue, but I’ve still been painting a lot of metals and such lately, so I know I’ve got something else to look forward(!) to when I get solidly into more of the plastics.

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  3. Very nice work! I’d never considered these things as potential Kill Team scenery before, but of course it works really well. If 90s TV taught me anything, it’s that a scrapyard is an excellent location for shady alien murders/daemon summoning.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Well, some more great work from you there. They certainly look really good all spread out across the game mat like that, and it’s no easy feat making cloned chunks look different. I guess if someone really wanted to, they could throw in a few strips of plasticard. But you’re a talented enough painter that you’re able to pull it off with just the stock models.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Cheers Faust – you’re right of course on the “best” way to disguise their cloned-ness and lack of undercuts.
      I guess I just consider that to be too much time/work/effort for me on this sort of piece (especially with this many of them to try and knock out) – so I try the middle ground of differentiating them with paint rather than just doing metal with rust but not the whole hog of adding additional plasticard details like you might see from someone like Krautscientist.

      Liked by 1 person

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